20
results found
1 - 20 of 20 Results
Date:
This facilitator’s handbook is designed for women peace activists and women leaders. Its purpose is to empower women leaders and women peace activists by giving them the necessary tools that will not only promote and increase their effective participation in the peace processes but equip them with the information and techniques to train other women peace activists.
Date:
This report on the proceedings of the global conference “Gender-inclusive peace processes: Strengthening women’s meaningful participation through constituency building” explores current challenges, best practices, and recommendations on how best to leverage the practice of constituency building to further gender-inclusive peace.
Date:
This Gender and COVID-19 training module introduce the impact of COVID-19 on women/gender from a Development aspect including Health, Economic, Women Peace and Security (WPS) and Social Cohesion perspective. With a number of gender related health issues exists in Myanmar, COVID-19 pandemic exacerbates negative impact on women and girls in different sectors including health and economic sector. In health sector, there are impacts on not only those who are seeking health services.
Date:
Beyond Kabul: Women peacebuilders’ reflections on the peace process and the impact of COVID-19
Date:
Bringing together the views of over 800 Afghan women, from eight provinces and various social groups, this study aims to highlight the perspectives of the Afghan women on the peace process, to better inform political elites and decision makers of their concerns; thus, facilitating informed decisions during the intra-Afghan peace negotiations with the Taliban.
Date:
Women play diverse roles in the context of armed conflict; as culturally designated caregivers, women must struggle to support their families and keep their households together while the breadwinners fight, or are apprehended or killed. Women and girls are equally affected in a fragile environment where social services and other basic needs become harder/impossible to fulfil. As a primary provider, women are exposed to further abuse.
Date:
Along with the Timor-Leste government’s effort in advancing the agenda of NAP 1325 in UNSCR on Women, Peace and Security, there has been an escalation on the number of women’s participation in the decision making and peace building role started from the community, up to the institutional level.
Date:
Child marriage takes away a girl’s right to safe and healthy childhood, quality and complete education that can lead to decent economic opportunities, and social and political empowerment. Pakistan has the 6th highest number of girls married before the age of 18 in the world. Child marriage is prevalent due to several reasons including deeply entrenched traditions and customs, poverty, lack of awareness and/or access to education, and lack of security.
Date:
The COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting nationwide restricted mobility is exacerbating the pre-existing social and economic inequalities, adding more layers of barriers, discrimination and threats for women in their homes and communities. The brief reflects the situation and voices of women and gender diverse people from the ground, constantly battling against these challenges.
Date:
The Transitional Justice and Reconciliation Commission or TJRC is one of the bodies created under the Annex on Normalization of the Comprehensive Agreement on the Bangsamoro (CAB), the agreement between the Philippine Government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF).
Date:
In Viet Nam, women work in agriculture as unpaid labourers on family farms and as paid or unpaid workers at other farms and agricultural enterprises.
Date:
A new UN study on men’s use of violence against women was launched at the Foreign Correspondents’ Club of Thailand on 10 September 2013. The study of over 10,000 men in Asia and the Pacific found that nearly half of those men interviewed reported using physical or sexual violence against a female partner, ranging from 26 percent to 80 percent across the sites. Nearly a quarter of men interviewed reported perpetrating rape against a woman or girl, ranging from 10 percent to 62 percent across the sites.
Date:
Though there is no uniformity in the practices being observed within Indian states to protect women from domestic violence, a number of them seem to be promising acts of change.
Date:
Read this Resource Tool on how the Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act (PWDVA) safeguards women’s right to justice through protection officers and NGOs. The tool also contains information about civil and criminal procedure laws.
Date:
Though there is no uniformity in the practices being observed within Indian states to protect women from domestic violence, a number of them seem to be promising acts of change.
Date:
Preventing and Responding to Domestic Violence through a Multi-Sectoral Approach
Date:
This report covers a joint resolution by women peace activists from South Asia that was presented to the United Nations Secretary-General.
Date:
This national action plan by the Government of Nepal and civil society sets the strategy to involve women in Nepal’s peace building process.
Date:
Fourth in the series of ‘Staying Alive’, this report tracks the implementation of the 2005 Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act.
Date:
This is the first monitoring and evaluation report on the Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act (PWDVA) in India. It attempts to capture emerging trends in the implementation of the law and highlights best practices from different states.