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The provision, coordination and governance of essential, multisector health, police, justice, and social services can significantly mitigate the consequences that violence has on the well-being, health and safety of women and girls’ lives, assist in the recovery and empowerment of women, and stop violence from reoccurring.
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A week ago, a 5.9 magnitude earthquake struck the Central Region of Afghanistan impacting Paktika and Khost provinces. Humanitarian assistance is being delivered in the most affected districts.
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On 22 June, at 01:30am, an earthquake of magnitude 5.9 has struck the southeastern provinces of Paktika and Khost (Central Region of Afghanistan), killing at least 770 people and injuring another 1,500. 1,500 homes have reportedly been destroyed and damaged in Gayan2 (Paktika Province). According to OCHA and humanitarian teams delivering the response in the two provinces, immediate needs identified on the ground on 22 June include emergency trauma care, emergency shelter and non-food items, food assistance and WASH.
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These documents highlight key accomplishments supported by the Pacific Partnership in Fiji, Kiribati, Solomon Islands, and Tonga.
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This report presents the findings, lessons, conclusions, and recommendations of the Independent External Midterm Evaluation of the Pacific Partnership implemented between November 2020 and April 2021 by hera and Aid Works under the governance of an Evaluation Reference Group that included representatives of donors, partners and implementing civil society organisations (CSOs).
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This publication showcases the results of Rapid Gender Assessment surveys (RGAs) on the impact of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in seven countries in Asia and the Pacific. For some of these countries, this is the second round of RGAs and thus these findings may follow up those of “Unlocking the Lockdown”. The report is meant to be a statistical snapshot that could inform responses to the crisis but is not meant to provide policy recommendations or analyze the policy context in each country.
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This study looks at the challenges, barriers, and opportunities of women-led and women-focused CSOs across Afghanistan working in different sectors, with the aim to inform how part­ners can strengthen their power and agency and support them to respond to the needs of the most marginalized and vulnerable communities as well as their participation and leadership within the humanitarian response in Afghanistan. This study has been made possible with the generosity of the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) of the British Government.
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The fall of Afghanistan’s government to Taliban rule has further limited the ability of women and girls to exercise their rights, forcing many to flee their homes, seeking safety either elsewhere within the country or in neighbouring countries. This factsheet examines the needs, fears, and barriers encountered by Afghan women and girls who are internally displaced or who have fled abroad. It is the first in a series that will examine the changing situation in Afghanistan as additional data become available. It was produced by the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).
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This Guidance Note on Gender-responsive conflict analysis initially developed in Afghanistan has global applicability. It provides recommendations on how to apply a gender lens in political and conflict analysis in a way that allows the integration of gender as a variable of power across a social, political, economic analysis of conflict as opposed to addressing issues specific to women and girls in siloed analysis. This approach reveals the critical links between gender dynamics of conflict and peacebuilding.
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Check out the profiles of the 2020 gender champions and learn the impacts they have created in enabling a more gender-equal business world.
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This research analyses Pakistan’s security protocols through a dual lens of gender and peacebuilding and aims to fill the knowledge gap to support the integration of gendered perspectives into the security policies of Pakistan. It triangulates the global Women Peace and Security (WPS) Agenda with the Preventing Violent Extremism (PVE) practice to undertake a comparative analysis of National Action Plans of three regional countries: Jordan, Indonesia, and Bangladesh.
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The research study analyses the gendered aspects of the ethnic and religious conflict in Pakistan that can potentially lead to a breakdown of social cohesion and stability. There was a focus on how women are affected by and implicated in situations of conflict and violence.
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This report analyses the gendered aspects of the ethnic and religious conflict in Pakistan that can potentially lead to a breakdown of social cohesion and stability. In order to effectively understand the drivers of conflict and the factors that threaten community security and social cohesion focusing on women and young women, UN Women commissioned a research study titled: “Resilience, Community Security and Social Cohesion through Effective Women’s Leadership”.
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The purpose of this Gender Alert is to document and analyze the impact of the rapidly evolving Afghan context on women’s rights and gender equality. This Alert focuses on developments since the Taliban take-over of Kabul on 15 August 2021, shedding light on the impact of the current contextual dynamics on the rights of women and girls.
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The current conflict and political uncertainty in Afghanistan has clear gendered impacts. Restrictive gender norms and harmful practices are being exacerbated. Women and girls are at risk of further marginalization and being left behind. It is critical that women’s voices continue to be consulted, amplified and inform humanitarian decision-making through their participation in humanitarian assessments. Given the current circumstances.
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In Pakistan, Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) is widespread, normalized and legitimized because of pervasive gender inequality and deep-rooted patriarchy. Pakistan ranks at 151 out of 153 countries according to the World Economic Forum’s Gender Gap report 2018 and 164 out of 167 in the Women, Peace and Security Index 2019. Violence Against Women (VAW) is significant in Pakistan and pervades every class, ethnicity, religion, geographical location and age group.
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[End Term Project Evaluation Report] The project “Economic Empowerment of Women Home Based Workers (HBWs) and Excluded Groups in Pakistan” had a three-year duration (April 2017-June 2020). The project is also referred as ‘the third phase of WEE Programme’ conceived jointly with Government of Norway’s support and funding through a shared strategic interest in promotion and protection of WHBWs.
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Globally, women have long been at the frontlines of conflict and crisis, often leading and participatingin negotiations with parties in conflict to arrive at truce and ceasefire modalities. Yet often, women’sexpertise and priorities are excluded from formal ceasefire agreements and monitoring mechanisms.This exclusion is informed by the assumption that discussion on ceasefire requires technical knowledgeon military skills.
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Child marriage takes away a girl’s right to safe and healthy childhood, quality and complete education that can lead to decent economic opportunities, and social and political empowerment. Pakistan has the 6th highest number of girls married before the age of 18 in the world. Child marriage is prevalent due to several reasons including deeply entrenched traditions and customs, poverty, lack of awareness and/or access to education, and lack of security.
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A time-use survey has not previously been conducted in Afghanistan. As a result, there are data gaps on the contribution to human well-being by Afghan women through their unpaid cooking, cleaning and caring for family as well as their contribution to family businesses. Their work is statistically unrecognized despite the large amounts of women’s time that it consumes, and the restrictions it places on women’s ability to engage in other activities.