7
results found
1 - 7 of 7 Results
Date:
This facilitator’s handbook is designed for women peace activists and women leaders. Its purpose is to empower women leaders and women peace activists by giving them the necessary tools that will not only promote and increase their effective participation in the peace processes but equip them with the information and techniques to train other women peace activists.
Date:
The Women living under the pandemic and military rule survey looks at the way that women are affected by macro developments and trends. It is important to understand the real-time social and economic impacts of COVID-19 and the military rule, not just for measures of income poverty but also for vulnerability more generally and for how the double crisis is impacting Myanmar’s women both at the family and individual levels.
Date:
This publication was originally conceived by UN Women under the UN Women Centering Women and their priorities in Myanmar’s Peace Process: Implementing the United Nations Security Council Resolution and Related Resolutions 1325, and has been made possible through funding from the Norwegian Ministry for Foreign Affairs.
Date:
Violent extremism has emerged as one of the leading challenges to the realization of sustainable peace globally. Across South and South-East Asia, violent extremism poses a direct threat to inclusive development by fuelling intolerance, forcibly displacing communities, exacerbating cycles of insecurity and armed conflict, exploiting existing inequalities, and obstructing the enjoyment of human rights and the rule of law. Underpinning this violence are gender stereotypes that are used to radicalize and recruit men and women, as well as girls and boys, to violent extremist groups.
Date:
The Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement in Myanmar: A Gender Equality and Women’s Rights Analysis - Designed to enrich the implementation of Myanmar's Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement (NCA) from a gender equality standpoint, this publication profiles and analyses women’s participation in the nationwide ceasefire negotiations. It emphasises the fact that the ongoing peace process in Myanmar must include a critical mass of gender-aware and capacitated women who can strategically influence...
Date:
In Myanmar, as in many other parts of the world, politics, conflict and peace negotiations are considered “male domains.”1 With some exceptions,2 women’s experiences of armed conflict and contributions to peace are largely unrecognized, undocumented and unaccounted for. But many women who have had distinct experiences of armed conflict are engaging within their communities in creative strategies to mitigate the impact of conflict, make and build enduring peace. However, these...
Date:
Women’s striking absence from peace talks has become one of the standard features of these important conflict resolution forums. Since 1992, fewer than 10 per cent of peace negotiators have been women, and there has been little improvement in this figure since the passage of resolution 1325 (2000). This situation cries out for determined and concrete action requiring mediators and members of negotiating teams to include women. Mechanisms are also needed to...