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The framework was developed to help build a common understanding between Development Partners (DPs) regarding gender equality and social inclusion. Nepal has achieved significant progress in addressing these issues, supported by positive national and international commitments. However, a large proportion of Nepal’s population continues to be affected by discrimination. A more coherent approach among DPs will ensure further coordinated collective support to the Government of Nepal.
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On 25 September 2015, the UN Member States adopted a roadmap to sustainable development by 2030.  In the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the accompanying Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), gender equality and women’s empowerment is recognized as a vital means to help accelerate sustainable development through a key stand-alone development goal (SDG5) and through gender mainstreamed in all other goals. This booklet builds on UN Women's analysis on Women and the...
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UN Women Bangladesh and ACDI/VOCA brought together 50 women leaders from around the south-west of Bangladesh to further understand the challenges and opportunities of rural women in severely climate-affected areas of the country. This report reflects the discussions and concerns of women leaders in resilience, disaster preparedness, and climate change, and gives key recommendations for development partners working in gender and climate change.
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Summary on how United Nations in Thailand workings to improve girls and women lives and rights.
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Evaluation findings suggest that UN Women's collaboration with the Positive Women's Network (PWN+) from 2006 to 2011 was instrumental in providing a safespace, counseling, health and income generating services to women living with HIV.
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The call for a transformative framework to achieve women’s rights and gender equality comes in the midst of a global conversation about the legacy and next steps after the MDGs. Intergovernmental and UN-led processes are currently under way to inform and design a post-2015 development agenda and SDGs.
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International migration, especially of women migrant workers is driven by, among other factors: the search for decent jobs (Priority 1); access to resources including energy sources and water (Priorities 2 and 5); the urbanization drive that sees men and women and their families migrate internationally from rural areas in countries of origin to cities in countries of destination (Priority 3); food insecurity and unsustainable agricultural systems (Priority 4); and climate change and environmental degradation (linked to priorities 2, and 5-7).
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International Conventions and Human Rights Standards in the Framework:1. CEDAW: The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women2. GR No. 26: the CEDAW Committee’s General Recommendation No. 26 on Women Migrant Workers3. ICRMW: International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families4. GC No. 1: the Committee on Migrant Workers’ General Comment No. 1 on Migrant Domestic Workers
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International Conventions and Regional Human Rights Standards in the Framework: CEDAW: The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women GR No. 26: the CEDAW Committee’s General Recommendation No. 26 on Women Migrant Workers ICRMW: International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families GC No. 1: the Committee on Migrant Workers’ General Comment No. 1 on Migrant Domestic Workers ASEAN Declaration: The ASEAN Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers
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Women represent two thirds of the poor in Asia. Over 50% of all international migrants in Asia are women – the bulk of whom are employed as domestic workers.
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Women’s migration in search of decent work and sustainable livelihoods, to support themselves and their families has become an enduring structural feature of international migration, which is set to be one of the mega-trends of the 21st century. The “feminization” of migration is most visible in Asia, where women – especially young women - constitute over half of all migrant workers. In Nepal, women represent over 68% of migrants, while in Indonesia this figure is even higher – 83%. Domestic work is the dominant profession for migrant women with women representing 83% of domestic workers worldwide.
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The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), adopted on 18 December 1979 and entering into force on 3 September 1981 is an international Convention that is also known as the “International Bill of Rights for Women”. It is one of the core human rights treaties, and with 187 States Parties, CEDAW remains one of the most highly ratified UN Conventions. Governments who commit to CEDAW are legally bound to eliminate discrimination against women, including women migrant workers. The Convention comprehensively defines discrimination against women as including sexual and gender-based violence against women, and other human rights violations. CEDAW enjoys widespread support throughout Asia – for instance all Member States of ASEAN (the Association of Southeast Asian Nations) have ratified CEDAW. Several other Asian countries have also made the commitment to implement CEDAW. All Member States of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation have committed to CEDAW.
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In a village meeting in August 2010 in Maharashtra, India, a woman farmer in the presence of thirty women and twenty-one men said: “When the land is in my husband’s name, I am only a worker.
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Rural, indigenous people live in two simultaneous situations. While they have highly developed capabilities for management of biodiverse natural resources, they are lodged in a discriminated, excluded existence, away from the centre stage of economic and technological change.