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The document was produced by Humanitarian Advisory Group, in close consultation with UN Women colleagues in Regional Office for Asia and Pacific, Headquarters, as well as Bangladesh Country Office
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The study report of National Women Commission, Nepal, monitors the progress on the implementation of the 2018, Concluding Observations issued by the CEDAW Committee on the sixth periodic report of Nepal. The progress was systematically monitored on the basis of a novel and practical tool.
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Child marriage takes away a girl’s right to safe and healthy childhood, quality and complete education that can lead to decent economic opportunities, and social and political empowerment. Pakistan has the 6th highest number of girls married before the age of 18 in the world. Child marriage is prevalent due to several reasons including deeply entrenched traditions and customs, poverty, lack of awareness and/or access to education, and lack of security.
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Stateless women and girls experience particular gender-related barriers, and the pandemic further exacerbated their vulnerability. Increased sexual and gender-based violence, socioeconomic impacts, school dropouts due to excess demands at home, forced marriage and early pregnancy are some of the major factors that continue to threaten to reverse hard-won gains on gender equality.
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This decision tree helps organizations working on violence against women migrant workers decide when and how to best collect data on women migrant worker’s experiences of violence and their access and use of relevant services.
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Adolescents and youth are a vital positive force in emergency preparedness and response. While they have wide-ranging capacities they also have unique needs, and too often adolescents are lost between programming for children and programming for older adults. In particular, adolescent girls are disproportionately affected by crises. Compared to boys, girls are less likely to be able to meet their basic needs.
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In July 2019, the Inter-Agency Standing Committee published Guidelines on the ‘Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action’ which set out essential actions that humanitarian actors must take in order to effectively identify and respond to the needs and rights of persons with disabilities.
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In the first six months of the COVID-19 pandemic, the disproportionate impact on women and girls has been severe across the region. As previously highlighted in a regional analysis, the pandemic has particularly affected women and girls by exacerbating burdens of unpaid care work, increasing risks of gender-based violence (GBV), impacting livelihoods of women disproportionately especially in the informal sector.
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This publication brings together the collective outcomes of both the Gender-Based Violence Area of Responsibility (GBV AoR) Task Team on Localization regional consultation in Asia and the Pacific (Bangkok, Thailand, August 2019), and the Voice-Visibility-Influence Consultation (Jakarta, Indonesia, August 2019), with case studies presented at the events and submitted by Gender in Humanitarian Action Working Group members.
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A new guideline “Cash & Voucher Assistance and Gender-Based Violence Compendium: Practical Guidance for Humanitarian Practitioner” is to be finalized by May 2019. The guidance was developed through the efforts of 15 NGO and UN organizations who contributed expertise in the inception, design and review of the document.
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In 2017, UNHCR and UN Women partnered to conduct a gender analysis of the right to a nationality in Myanmar. This was implemented by the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC), along with local CSO The Seagull, the Statelessness Network Asia Pacific (SNAP) and the Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion (ISI). The report was launched on 7 March 2018 as part of a series of events celebrating International Women’s Day. Conducted in Mawlamyine, Mandalay and Yangon, the study included participants...
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Time to Act on Gender, Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction. An overview of progress in the Pacific region with evidence from The Republic of Marshall Islands, Vanuatu and Samoa. Gender equality and the empowerment of women become ever more important as the frequency and severity of storms, floods, drought and other climatic hazards increase in the Pacific region. Due to prevailing gender inequalities and social norms, women and girls are disproportionately affected by climate change and disaster...
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With the growing recognition that laws and justice systems are not adequately working for women, Justice Base led a research report to examine women access to justice in the formal and informal processes, decision-makers and institutions that play a role in resolving dispute involving women in Myanmar. Traditional dispute mechanisms are often preferred by women because of the high cost of the state legal system, corruption, gender bias, and language barriers for ethnic minorities who are non-Myanmar language speakers.
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With the purpose to eliminate gender stereotypes in justice delivery as a critical component of promoting women’s access to justice, this paper seeks to develop critical understanding among judges and other justice actors on gender stereotypes, and how it could be avoid, as well as to provide judicial training programmes for justice actors in investigation and adjudication.
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This paper endeavors to analyze Case Laws regarding core Articles of the Convention on Elimination of All Form of Discrimination and their application in Southeast Asia national courts. It is an analytical compilation of jurisprudence from Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Timor-Leste that is intended to serve as a resource to enhance their capacity to utilize international human rights standards for the realization of women’s human rights embodied in the Convention.
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This paper endeavors to compile good practices, challenges and to strengthen the capacity of National Women’s Machineries for monitoring implementation of CEDAW and BPFA.
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The paper highlights the legal gap that still exist in violence against women in Asia that lead to create a culture of impunity in which the perpetrator go unpunished by reinforcing a message that he will not be held accountable for his action. Challenges in implementing human rights law in order to make rights to women and girls not meaningless still need to be endeavored in all the Asian countries. The lack of adequate laws and structure to safeguard witnesses and ensure their security, as...