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The pandemic highlighted the immense challenges that women face in their health, safety and livelihoods. Many women, especially those in vulnerable communities, have lost a generation’s worth of economic gains. With the increase in gender-based violence and the reversal of decades of advancement for women in the workplace, we have reached an inflection point for gender equality.
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“Participating in the Second Chance Education and Vocational Learning Programme has made me confident,” says Bulbul Akter, 24, a seamstress, turkey farmer and community outreach volunteer from Ukhiya Cox’s Bazar. “Now, I am known to my relatives and neighbours as a self-reliant woman. I am contributing to my family and the wider community, and I can support my daughter’s studies. I have requested that my two sisters also enrol in this programme.”
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Funded by the Swedish International Development Agency, the EmPower project aims to contribute to the implementation of climate change and disaster risk reduction actions in Asia and the Pacific that address the key drivers of gender-based vulnerabilities while enhancing human rights.
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UN Women Indonesia rolled out the project from June 2020 through May 2021. At the end of the project, 610 women benefited from the cash-based interventions, 100 women received advocacy and leadership training, and more than 100 individuals received knowledge on coordinated quality services to better support and empower women's migrant workers. In addition, 11 women’s crisis centers and shelters across the country were supported to ensure that services for women’s survivors of violence could continue during the pandemic.
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This document will focus on examining the impact of COVID-19 on ethnic minority groups in Viet Nam, especially ethnic minority women. It will also analyze the implementation efficiency of direct cash transfer and social protection policies for ethnic minority groups from a gender equality lens. The document will propose policy recommendations towards the development and implementation of supporting policies and programmes in emergency situations to ensure gender responsiveness.
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The World Economic Forum says that at the current rate of change, it will take 108 years to close the overall gender gap and 202 years to bring parity in the workplace. India has one of the lowest female labour force participation rates in the world and a majority of women work in the informal sector.
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The “UN Women impact stories series”, updated quarterly, illustrates the human impact of UN Women’s work across Asia and the Pacific, highlighting the partnerships that make this work possible. These stories share how we and our many partners are striding forward to realize a better world for women and girls—one of equality and empowerment because that is what we do and who we are, as a leader, mobilizer, convenor, and provider of programmes.
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This paper is a review of gender mainstreaming principles and examples of interventions by countries and organisations in Asia and the Pacific region. It also includes tools and approaches to mainstream gender into climate change and disaster risk reduction policies.
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Women and girls have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic’s social isolation and economic fallout. They face increased violence, unpaid care work, and other inequalities and violations of their rights.
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At the same time the world is witnessing changing future of work and women’s share in the gig economy is increasing. Reports indicate positive aspects of this growth, such as the financial independence women gain from entering this economy as well as enhancement in the sense of self-identity for those who participate in the economy through platforms that help them advertise and sell their goods and services. However, this area is also fraught with challenges for women. While the ease of doing business that comes from using digital platforms clearly facilitates women’s participation, it also renders them susceptible to sudden changes in employment opportunities or fluctuations in the economy.
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The 2018-2019 Annual Report highlights progress made around the Asia Pacific Region to make the vision of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals a reality for women and girls. UN Women stands behind women’s equal participation in all aspects of life, focusing on five priority areas: increasing women’s leadership and participation; ending violence against women; engaging women in all aspects of peace and security processes; enhancing women's economic empowerment.
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Supported by photos, data, infographics, and individual impact stories, the annual report highlights key achievements of the 18 active projects in 2019. It offers a snapshot of the impact the global pandemic caused by COVID-19 on grantees and the populations they serve, and the ways they are responding to it. Finally, it presents the results from its latest efforts to accelerate progress by fostering innovation and peer learning.
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This report tells UN Women’s story over the period 2019–2020. It shares how we and our many partners are striding forward to realize a better world for women and girls—one of equality and empowerment. Looking forward, we will draw on our full resources and experiences in protecting and advancing the rights of all women and girls. That is what we do and who we are, as a leader, mobilizer, convenor, provider of programmes, and partner for change.
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The 2019 Annual Report of the United Nations in China highlights results and impacts in the following priority areas; poverty reduction and equitable development, improved and sustainable environment, enhanced global engagement with an emphasis on cross-cutting areas such as gender equality, and leaving no one behind.
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The linkages between organized crime, including trafficking in persons, and violent extremism are a global concern. These linkages are starting to receive some attention, but this is limited to specific conflict contexts such as Iraq and Syria. In recognition of the link between violent extremism and trafficking in persons and the gendered nature of both, the UN Security Council adopted its first resolution on trafficking in persons in areas affected by armed conflict in 2016 (UNSCR 2331). But overall, there is little understanding of the relationship between violent extremism and trafficking in persons, or of how gender informs this interaction.
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This alert focuses on a pillar of the women, peace and security agenda of particular relevance in Afghanistan today – participation. Specifically, the alert engages stakeholders on how to collectively ensure women’s meaningful participation in an intra-Afghan peace process.
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UN Women Afghanistan issues this alert, as a preliminary outline of gender specific considerations of the rapidly evolving situation in Afghanistan of the impact of COVID-19.
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They were developed on the basis of the IASC Policy Statement on Gender Equality in Humanitarian Action (November 2017)1, and in light of lessons learned from the Ebola and Zika outbreaks and emerging gender impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. The goal is to mobilize inter-agency support within the Nepal Humanitarian Country Team in ensuring these principles are reflected in the emergency response activities in support of the Government of Nepal.
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The 2018–2019 annual report highlights the past year’s achievements and key results in 2008, which directly reached more than 90,000 women at local, national, and regional levels. Some key results from 2018 include: [*] 25 women-led civil society organizations’ capacities strengthened [*] 256,000 beneficiaries sensitized on women’s rights [*] 23,700 women gained technical leadership, literacy, and vocational skills [*] 4,000 men engaged as allies [*] 20,740 women with increased incomes [*] 255 women trained who were appointed or elected into leadership positions.
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This document aims to inform Sri Lanka’s national policy on the protection of rights of women migrant domestic workers. Guided by normative commitments and international standards on gender equality and migrant labour rights, the document captures the concerns of a diverse set of stakeholders, including government officials, civil society representatives, and the most marginalized women migrant domestic workers.