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“Participating in the Second Chance Education and Vocational Learning Programme has made me confident,” says Bulbul Akter, 24, a seamstress, turkey farmer and community outreach volunteer from Ukhiya Cox’s Bazar. “Now, I am known to my relatives and neighbours as a self-reliant woman. I am contributing to my family and the wider community, and I can support my daughter’s studies. I have requested that my two sisters also enrol in this programme.”
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UN Women’s Second Chance Education and Vocational Learning Programme enables women to re-enter formal education, access vocational training, learn entrepreneurial skills, and connects them to employment and business opportunities.
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There are many benefits from partnering with UN Women. To recognize valuable work and generous contributions, UN Women provides communications and public relations support for maximum visibility of the partnerships. In addition to global recognition and visibility, partners have the opportunity to build corporate networks and relationships with like-minded businesses, philanthropic leaders, and client bases in UN Women-led initiatives such as the Generation Equality Forum, HeForShe, the Unstereotype Alliance, and the Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs). Our private sector partners may also experience positive effects on their overall businesses through collaborating with UN Women, for example, higher sales, stronger customer and supplier relationships, and a boost to employee morale and loyalty.
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Human trafficking is an issue that transcends national borders. Women and girls are disproportionately affected by this crime. Although research shows that increasing the number of women in law enforcement results in law enforcement that is more responsive to women’s needs and more operationally effective, women represent a small share of law enforcement officers in the ASEAN Region ranging from 6% in Indonesia to 20% in Lao PDR. In 2017, UN Women and UNODC set out to jointly mitigate these challenges, leading up to a four-year partnership between the agencies.
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UN Women’s Second Chance Education and Vocational Learning Programme enables women to re-enter formal education, learn vocational and entrepreneurial skills and connects them to employment and business opportunities. Since 2018, it has impacted more than 15,000 women in India from some of the poorest and most vulnerable areas.
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Women and girls have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic’s social isolation and economic fallout. They face increased violence, unpaid care work, and other inequalities and violations of their rights.
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Earlier this year, UN Women Asia and the Pacific and World Design Organization (WDO) “sat together” virtually to collaborate on the persistent issue of violence against women and girls in the region.
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The 20th anniversary of the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda is a critical moment for the agenda and its relevance, which has been tested by the extensive impacts of COVID-19. This publication takes stock of the progress as well as the gaps in implementing WPS in the Asia Pacific region over the last 20 years, and builds upon the lessons learned to move the WPS agenda forward in the years to come.
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UN Women, UNICEF and Human Rights Watch joint­ly issue this fifteenth alert to continue to highlight the gender specific impact of COVID-19 in Afghanistan. This alert focuses on the impact of the COVID-19 pandem­ic on women and girls’ education and the long-lasting consequences it will have on gender equality, women’s human rights and Afghanistan’s development and peace efforts.
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Supported by photos, data, infographics, and individual impact stories, the annual report highlights key achievements of the 18 active projects in 2019. It offers a snapshot of the impact the global pandemic caused by COVID-19 on grantees and the populations they serve, and the ways they are responding to it. Finally, it presents the results from its latest efforts to accelerate progress by fostering innovation and peer learning.
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“Unless we see changes in the gender and power dynamics to change gender based violence, it’s like pouring water over the back of a duck- violence will not change. School-related GBV is a fairly recent area of attention in the education community. The new SRGBV guidance provides core components of addressing GBV, and sets out safe approaches to respond and collect data. We need to see the reflection of teachers, students, parents on gender norms to change GBV in schools.”...
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The report specifically calls upon the Government of Afghanistan to acknowledge the commission of wartime atrocities, develop protection programs and support services for victims and witnesses of attacks against women, and foster an institutional culture in which women’s participation in the justice system, whether professionally or personally, is promoted and encouraged.
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This report and photo-essay are aimed at sharing the "live experience" of women and girls in India and ensuring that the voices especially those remain socially, economically and geographically marginalised are meaningfully reflected in the emerging post-2015 development discourse and agenda.
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UN Women Afghanistan Newsletter Issue No. 1
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This policy brief is an effort to highlight key policy recommendations to address critical gender concerns in the higher education sector. The recognition and redressal of inequalities in higher education has become a matter of considerable urgency in contemporary India.
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A civil society initiative coordinated by the National Alliance of Women (NAWO), the Ministry of Women and Child Development (MWCD), UNIFEM (now UN Women) and UNDP – presents recommendations to ensure that the Eleventh Five Year Plan is gender friendly.