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“Participating in the Second Chance Education and Vocational Learning Programme has made me confident,” says Bulbul Akter, 24, a seamstress, turkey farmer and community outreach volunteer from Ukhiya Cox’s Bazar. “Now, I am known to my relatives and neighbours as a self-reliant woman. I am contributing to my family and the wider community, and I can support my daughter’s studies. I have requested that my two sisters also enrol in this programme.”
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UN Women’s Second Chance Education and Vocational Learning Programme enables women to re-enter formal education, access vocational training, learn entrepreneurial skills, and connects them to employment and business opportunities.
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It cannot be stressed enough that violence against women and girls continues to be one of the most pervasive human rights violations in the world. It acts as both a cause and a consequence of gender inequality, and ranges in impact from adverse effects on the health, safety, productivity and overall well-being of women and girls, to impeding the realization of their rights and contribution to society at large. Despite decades of concerted efforts, at the global, regional and local levels.
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UN Women’s Second Chance Education and Vocational Learning Programme enables women to re-enter formal education, learn vocational and entrepreneurial skills and connects them to employment and business opportunities. Since 2018, it has impacted more than 15,000 women in India from some of the poorest and most vulnerable areas.
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The study report of National Women Commission, Nepal, monitors the progress on the implementation of the 2018, Concluding Observations issued by the CEDAW Committee on the sixth periodic report of Nepal. The progress was systematically monitored on the basis of a novel and practical tool.
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The study report of the National Women’s Commission of Nepal provides the implementation status of the 2018, Concluding Observations of the CEDAW Committee on the sixth periodic report of Nepal. The report serves as tool for enabling the State to fulfil its human rights obligation, particularly in light of the seventh periodic report that has to be submitted to the CEDAW Committee in November 2022.
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This decision tree helps organizations working on violence against women migrant workers decide when and how to best collect data on women migrant worker’s experiences of violence and their access and use of relevant services.
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These guidelines are intended to promote best practices for responsible, ethical and safe representation and reporting of violence against women (VAW) and violence against children (VAC) by media practitioners. While the causes, risk factors, prevalence, patterns and consequences of violence against women and violence against children may differ, many of the considerations for ethically, safely and effectively communicating these issues are crosscutting.
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UN Women, UNICEF and Human Rights Watch joint­ly issue this fifteenth alert to continue to highlight the gender specific impact of COVID-19 in Afghanistan. This alert focuses on the impact of the COVID-19 pandem­ic on women and girls’ education and the long-lasting consequences it will have on gender equality, women’s human rights and Afghanistan’s development and peace efforts.
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UN Women, the International Commission of Jurists (ICJ) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) are jointly implementing a five-year programme, generously funded by the Government of Sweden, entitled Enhancing Access to Justice for Women in Asia and the Pacific: Bridging the gap between formal and informal systems through women’s empowerment. The project will be implemented at the regional level, with initially six countries of focus: Indonesia...
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This is a report that was developed by Secretary of State for Gender Equality and Social Inclusion (SEIGIS) on the implementation of the 2016 Concluding Observations of the CEDAW committee. The publication was developed based on the 2016 annual reports submitted by line Ministries to the Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation Unit under the Office of Prime Minister.
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“Unless we see changes in the gender and power dynamics to change gender based violence, it’s like pouring water over the back of a duck- violence will not change. School-related GBV is a fairly recent area of attention in the education community. The new SRGBV guidance provides core components of addressing GBV, and sets out safe approaches to respond and collect data. We need to see the reflection of teachers, students, parents on gender norms to change GBV in schools.”...
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This publication highlights some of the practices, learnings and reflections garnered in the course of implementing this project, and especially through the voices of the women leaders and project partners who are the key actors in these initiatives.
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This CEDAW-based legal review of the Magna Carta of migrant workers and the anti-trafficking laws in the Philippines is indispensable to give concrete recommendations on improving laws that protect women migrant workers. It aims to identify gender discrimination in laws and underscore state obligations to address existing gender discrimination in laws.
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This review comprised chiefly of desk research. To determine whether the Philippines has complied with its state obligations, the study used the UN-identified CEDAW indicators contained in the handbook entitled Do Our Laws Promote Gender Equality?
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This Guide discusses how migration is mainstreamed into the Philippines development framework, particularly from a gender perspective. This requires mainstreaming M&D issues in every phase of the development planning cycle.
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This brief discusses how migration is mainstreamed into the Philippines development framework, particularly from a gender perspective. This requires mainstreaming migration and development (M&D) issues in every phase of the development planning cycle.
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This paper highlights the unique discriminations and exclusions lesbians, bisexual women, transgender and intersex persons (LBTI) face across the region as well as the challenging issue that gender and sexual diversity remains based on the proceedings of the 2016 Regional Consultation on Promoting and Protecting the Rights of Lesbians, Bisexual women, Transgender and Despite changes in national legislations and policies, such as the abolition of a ban on same-sex marriages...
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With the growing recognition that laws and justice systems are not adequately working for women, Justice Base led a research report to examine women access to justice in the formal and informal processes, decision-makers and institutions that play a role in resolving dispute involving women in Myanmar. Traditional dispute mechanisms are often preferred by women because of the high cost of the state legal system, corruption, gender bias, and language barriers for ethnic minorities who are non-Myanmar language speakers.
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With the purpose to eliminate gender stereotypes in justice delivery as a critical component of promoting women’s access to justice, this paper seeks to develop critical understanding among judges and other justice actors on gender stereotypes, and how it could be avoid, as well as to provide judicial training programmes for justice actors in investigation and adjudication.