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Supported by photos, data, infographics, and individual impact stories, the annual report highlights key achievements of the 18 active projects in 2019. It offers a snapshot of the impact the global pandemic caused by COVID-19 on grantees and the populations they serve, and the ways they are responding to it. Finally, it presents the results from its latest efforts to accelerate progress by fostering innovation and peer learning.
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This report tells UN Women’s story over the period 2019–2020. It shares how we and our many partners are striding forward to realize a better world for women and girls—one of equality and empowerment. Looking forward, we will draw on our full resources and experiences in protecting and advancing the rights of all women and girls. That is what we do and who we are, as a leader, mobilizer, convenor, provider of programmes, and partner for change.
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Summary on how United Nations in Thailand workings to improve girls and women lives and rights.
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From agriculture to traditional crafts, rural women sustain the informal sector in a variety of ways.
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Evaluation findings suggest that UN Women's collaboration with the Positive Women's Network (PWN+) from 2006 to 2011 was instrumental in providing a safespace, counseling, health and income generating services to women living with HIV.
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The Annual Report documents UN Women’s work to foster women’s empowerment and gender equality around the world.
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The 14 PICTs covered by the Fiji MCO are vastly diverse in relation to linguistics, socio-economic and natural environment, politics and culture. Most PICTs have small populations, based on numerous outer islands or atolls, spread over large distances, with few transport or communication resources, limited government services and often a dependence on imported basic goods.
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Annual Report documents UN Women’s work to foster women’s empowerment and gender equality around the world
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The call for a transformative framework to achieve women’s rights and gender equality comes in the midst of a global conversation about the legacy and next steps after the MDGs. Intergovernmental and UN-led processes are currently under way to inform and design a post-2015 development agenda and SDGs.
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We now look forward to building on the results and foundations we have put in place with our partners in leading towards realization of gender equality and empowermentof the women of Pakistan.
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This publication is meant to serve as a ready reference on the country-specific legal protections that exist for women migrant workers in source and destination countries in the programmeme countries of UN Women’s Asia & Arab States Regional programmeme on Empowering Women Migrant Workers in Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Jordan, Lao PDR, Nepal, Philippines. In addition, destination countries and territories such as Bahrain, Hong Kong SAR, UAE, Singapore and Thailand were included.
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The Annual Report documents UN Women’s work to foster women’s empowerment and gender equality around the world. It highlights some of the organization’s initiatives during the year and provides summary financial statements, a list of new programmes and projects, and contact information.
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This is an annual report 2012 of the Migration Working Group, an inter-ministerial and multi-stakeholder mechanism under the National Committee on the Suppression of Human Trafficking, Smuggling, Labor Exploitation and Sexual Exploitation in Women and Children. The Migration Working Group was officially established on September 26, 2012. Members of the working group consisted of Ministry of Interior, Ministry of Labor and Vocational training, Ministry of Women’s Affairs, other relevant ministries, international organizations, and NGOs. The working group has analyzed and overseen the implementation of national policy especially focusing on women’s issues in labor migration and has been recognized as one of the most remarkable developments in Cambodia’s protection of migrant workers.
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Violence and especially sexual violence against rural left behind girls is on the rise. Rural left behind girls have been left by their parents in rural areas while they go search for employment in urban areas. These girls do not have proper awareness of sexual violence or how to protect themselves, and with little or no guardianship are severely vulnerable to being taken advantage of. Rural left behind girls and migrant girls are China’s top two targeted groups for trafficking.
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It is important to distinguish between migration, smuggling and trafficking, because of the misperceptions that men migrate and women are trafficked – although men are also trafficked and increasing numbers of women are migrating independently.
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International migration, especially of women migrant workers is driven by, among other factors: the search for decent jobs (Priority 1); access to resources including energy sources and water (Priorities 2 and 5); the urbanization drive that sees men and women and their families migrate internationally from rural areas in countries of origin to cities in countries of destination (Priority 3); food insecurity and unsustainable agricultural systems (Priority 4); and climate change and environmental degradation (linked to priorities 2, and 5-7).
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International Conventions and Human Rights Standards in the Framework:1. CEDAW: The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women2. GR No. 26: the CEDAW Committee’s General Recommendation No. 26 on Women Migrant Workers3. ICRMW: International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families4. GC No. 1: the Committee on Migrant Workers’ General Comment No. 1 on Migrant Domestic Workers
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International Conventions and Regional Human Rights Standards in the Framework: CEDAW: The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women GR No. 26: the CEDAW Committee’s General Recommendation No. 26 on Women Migrant Workers ICRMW: International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families GC No. 1: the Committee on Migrant Workers’ General Comment No. 1 on Migrant Domestic Workers ASEAN Declaration: The ASEAN Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers
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Women represent two thirds of the poor in Asia. Over 50% of all international migrants in Asia are women – the bulk of whom are employed as domestic workers.
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Women’s migration in search of decent work and sustainable livelihoods, to support themselves and their families has become an enduring structural feature of international migration, which is set to be one of the mega-trends of the 21st century. The “feminization” of migration is most visible in Asia, where women – especially young women - constitute over half of all migrant workers. In Nepal, women represent over 68% of migrants, while in Indonesia this figure is even higher – 83%. Domestic work is the dominant profession for migrant women with women representing 83% of domestic workers worldwide.