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There are many benefits from partnering with UN Women. To recognize valuable work and generous contributions, UN Women provides communications and public relations support for maximum visibility of the partnerships. In addition to global recognition and visibility, partners have the opportunity to build corporate networks and relationships with like-minded businesses, philanthropic leaders, and client bases in UN Women-led initiatives such as the Generation Equality Forum, HeForShe, the Unstereotype Alliance, and the Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs). Our private sector partners may also experience positive effects on their overall businesses through collaborating with UN Women, for example, higher sales, stronger customer and supplier relationships, and a boost to employee morale and loyalty.
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[Infographics] Women who migrate for work contribute greatly to stronger societies and economies in both their countries of origin and their countries of destination. For many, the decision to work abroad involves prioritizing their families’ welfare over their own personal comfort and desires. Women generally have fewer options than men for regular migration, and are often employed in lower paid, informal sectors with few, if any, labour protections.
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These statistics set the tone for a series of conversations jointly hosted by UN Women and the French Embassy in Sri Lanka, in the broader context of COVID-19 and the parallel worsening of gender equality. In the course of the six discussions – each based on the thematic focus areas of the Generation Equality Forum – experts and activists repeatedly highlighted three underlying problems in relation to gender equality and women’s rights in Sri Lanka.
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UN Women 'WEPs Activator' 2.0 Capacity-building Programme
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In 2020, Bangladesh faced a double disaster Cyclone and COVID-19 in Khulna and Satkhira districts amongst the hardest hit. Thousands of families lost their livelihoods and incomes overnight. While the government provided direct assistance to those affected, many women and girls fell through the cracks. At the onset of the pandemic, UN Women expanded the group of NGOs that it worked with and created the Gender Monitoring Network (GMN), a network of 28 civil society organizations (CSOs) and women’s rights organizations. Organizations from the GMN supported UN Women in identifying vulnerable groups of women and girls, including transgender and sex workers, for unconditional cash assistance.
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These Action Cards provide practical actions for frontline service providers to consider and apply when they support women migrant workers who are at risk of, or subjected to violence. These 10 things in the Action Cards are based on the international principles and standards including the Essential Services Package for Women and Girls Subject to Violence with specific consideration of the needs of women migrant workers.
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The infographic was based on a policy research “Leveraging Digitalization to cope with COVID-19: An Indonesia case study on women-owned micro and small businesses” by UN Women in partnership with Pulse Lab Jakarta and Gojek, with the support of National Council for Financial Inclusion of Indonesia (S-DNKI).
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In order to become a Peace Village, members within a community commit to promoting and fostering tolerance and peace within their communities. Starting with making peace within the family, members then agree on guidelines to enhance social cohesion in the community.
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This first introductory brochure provides information about the Women's Empowerment Principles (WEPs) and UN Women's services to help private companies implement them, including through training and learning programs, technical assistance and innovative new initiatives, such as the UN Women WEPs Activator and Industry Disruptor that are bringing together companies from Asia and Europe to co-create gender-inclusive business and supply chains.
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Women and girls are part of the most vulnerable groups in times of humanitarian crisis such as COVID-19. To ensure all the information and available support are accessible to all, we need to ensure women’s representation and voices are visible at the decision-making level.
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Women and girls face even more violence in times of humanitarian crises, such as this moment with COVID- 19 and past outbreaks when movement is restricted. Violence against women has been called a “shadow pandemic” because it has huge consequences on the health and well-being of women and girls, but they often suffer in the shadows which has socio-economic costs that will last beyond the pandemic.
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The ‘WEPs Activator’ is UN Women’s capacity-building programme that brings together a cohort of up to 15 companies for an opportunity to learn and exchange knowledge and insight on gender-responsive policies and practices through training and mentoring.
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Having been the first region to face the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, markets and businesses in Asia-Pacific are now showing early signs of revival and leading the way towards a new economic reality. But until more progress is made, the positive developments in closing the gender gap could come under pressure. Despite a growing number of resources made available to develop women’s entrepreneurship, gender inequalities still exist. 
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The Toolkit provides comprehensive guidance on ensuring the protection and promotion of the rights of women migrant workers throughout the labour migration cycle. The Toolkit includes a policy brief series that describes the process of establishing national, bilateral and regional policy protections. The Gender-responsive Guidance on Employment Contracts supports relevant stakeholders to ensure these policies and protections are reflected in employment contracts. The Gender-responsive Self-assessment Tool for Recruitment Agencies provides recruiters with information on how to protect and promote the rights of women migrant workers in practice, throughout the migration cycle....
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Violence against women is one of the most pervasive human rights violations worldwide and has enormous costs for women’s health, safety and well-being. Globally, around 38 per cent of murders of women are committed by an intimate partner. Almost on-third of all women who have been in a relationship world-wider reported that they have experienced some form of violence...
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The Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) seek to change the course of the 21 st century by addressing key challenges such as poverty, inequality, health, and women’s empowerment. Ending violence against women would accelerate achieving the SDGs.
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With the generous support by the Australian Government, In June 2013, UN Women started a three-year long regional programme, “Leveraging Technical Tools, Evidence and Community Engagement to Advance the Implementation of Laws and Provision of Services to Women Experiencing Violence in South-East Asia” to help women who experienced violence to have proper access to services and laws and receive support from both the governments and...
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The women of ASEAN already contribute significantly to the ASEAN economies. Yet many obstacles remain which must be removed to ensure their equal participation in and benefit from ASEAN economic growth and development. This was one of the main findings of the research report on the Projected Gender Impact of the ASEAN Economic Community, undertaken by the ASEAN Secretariat, UN Women and the German political foundation Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES) with the support of the Australian Government...
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During March 2014, the United Nations Country Team in India partnered with the private sector, government, civil society, social media and arts community to promote gender equality.
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Violence against women and girls is a grave violation of human rights. It is not just a women’s issue but a human rights issue.