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UN Women and UNDP have piloted a training programme on Non-Violent Communication – a method which has found success in international mediation and conflict resolution settings – in Bangladesh, the Maldives and Sri Lanka. The project was generously supported by the Government of Australia and the European Union. This brief provides an overview of the approaches used in the pilot project and presents results from the evaluations of the trainings.
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The fall of Afghanistan’s government to Taliban rule has further limited the ability of women and girls to exercise their rights, forcing many to flee their homes, seeking safety either elsewhere within the country or in neighbouring countries. This factsheet examines the needs, fears, and barriers encountered by Afghan women and girls who are internally displaced or who have fled abroad. It is the first in a series that will examine the changing situation in Afghanistan as additional data become available. It was produced by the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).
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This Guidance Note on Gender-responsive conflict analysis initially developed in Afghanistan has global applicability. It provides recommendations on how to apply a gender lens in political and conflict analysis in a way that allows the integration of gender as a variable of power across a social, political, economic analysis of conflict as opposed to addressing issues specific to women and girls in siloed analysis. This approach reveals the critical links between gender dynamics of conflict and peacebuilding.
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Globally, women have long been at the frontlines of conflict and crisis, often leading and participatingin negotiations with parties in conflict to arrive at truce and ceasefire modalities. Yet often, women’sexpertise and priorities are excluded from formal ceasefire agreements and monitoring mechanisms.This exclusion is informed by the assumption that discussion on ceasefire requires technical knowledgeon military skills.
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Bringing together the views of over 800 Afghan women, from eight provinces and various social groups, this study aims to highlight the perspectives of the Afghan women on the peace process, to better inform political elites and decision makers of their concerns; thus, facilitating informed decisions during the intra-Afghan peace negotiations with the Taliban.
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Women play diverse roles in the context of armed conflict; as culturally designated caregivers, women must struggle to support their families and keep their households together while the breadwinners fight, or are apprehended or killed. Women and girls are equally affected in a fragile environment where social services and other basic needs become harder/impossible to fulfil. As a primary provider, women are exposed to further abuse.
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Beyond Kabul: Women peacebuilders’ reflections on the peace process and the impact of COVID-19
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In contemporary peacebuilding missions, such as that in Afghanistan, local ownership has been framed as the extent to which domestic actors control the design and implementation of the processes. What happens when local actors are not involved in its design? What happens when they begin to oppose it? And how much of the achievements under liberal frameworks and institutions are self-sustainable when international peacebuilders leave?
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UN Women and UNFPA, with contributions from the UNAMA, the International Legal Foundation (ILF) and Human Rights Watch (HRW), issue this 14th alert to continue to highlight the gender specific impacts of COVID-19 in Afghanistan. This alert focuses on the impact of COVID-19 on women and girls in prisons and detention settings, including girls in juvenile rehabilitation centers (JRCs).
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The Gender Alerts series highlights the disproportionate gender specific impacts of COVID-19 in Afghanistan, from the lack of services for survivors of violence to the challenges of building peace during a health crisis and a fast-paced rise in the burden of unpaid care work.
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This alert focuses on a pillar of the women, peace and security agenda of particular relevance in Afghanistan today – participation. Specifically, the alert engages stakeholders on how to collectively ensure women’s meaningful participation in an intra-Afghan peace process.
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This alert focuses on the implications of COVID-19 from a women, peace and security (WPS) perspective. It highlights the urgent need to ensure the continued implementation of Afghanistan’s National Action Plan on United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 (2019-2021), as well as how its implementation can contribute to long-term responses to COVID-19 that promote gender equality.
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An overview of the gender analysis of the humanitarian response to 2015’s Kunduz crisis in Afghanistan. The analysis was led by UN Women and the Norwegian Refugee Council, with support from IASC GenCap senior gender advisor and provides an evidence base for future advocacy to ensure women and girls are better integrated into humanitarian action.
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This report covers a joint resolution by women peace activists from South Asia that was presented to the United Nations Secretary-General.