16
results found
1 - 16 of 16 Results
Date:
The note is intended to support universities and university administrators, UN staff working with universities in this area, civil society partners, students and other relevant stakeholders—particularly in middle- and low-income countries where there are few resources for addressing violence against women. Universities should adopt targeted measures to address the needs of specific groups, including those most vulnerable and at risk (e.g. students with disabilities, migrants, and those from ethnic minorities, lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgender, intersex, and queer (LGBTIQ) individuals).
Date:
This Guidance Note on Gender-responsive conflict analysis initially developed in Afghanistan has global applicability. It provides recommendations on how to apply a gender lens in political and conflict analysis in a way that allows the integration of gender as a variable of power across a social, political, economic analysis of conflict as opposed to addressing issues specific to women and girls in siloed analysis. This approach reveals the critical links between gender dynamics of conflict and peacebuilding.
Date:
This guidance for Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) is an essential tool to make sure a coordinated response to VAW, including women migrant workers, is put in place. Because of the multi-faceted nature of VAW and the specific challenges and needs of women migrant workers, coordinated approaches to addressing it are considered more effective than when different actors work in isolation to address the issue.
Date:
The current conflict and political uncertainty in Afghanistan has clear gendered impacts. Restrictive gender norms and harmful practices are being exacerbated. Women and girls are at risk of further marginalization and being left behind. It is critical that women’s voices continue to be consulted, amplified and inform humanitarian decision-making through their participation in humanitarian assessments. Given the current circumstances.
Date:
This paper is a review of gender mainstreaming principles and examples of interventions by countries and organisations in Asia and the Pacific region. It also includes tools and approaches to mainstream gender into climate change and disaster risk reduction policies.
Date:
This note provides guidance on the safe use of remote technologies to provide support to women migrant workers who are at risk of, or have experienced violence, harassment, abuse or exploitation. The provision of services through remote technologies is not new. However, various remote methods are increasingly being used as technological innovations evolve and they become more accessible.
Date:
These guidelines are intended to promote best practices for responsible, ethical and safe representation and reporting of violence against women (VAW) and violence against children (VAC) by media practitioners. While the causes, risk factors, prevalence, patterns and consequences of violence against women and violence against children may differ, many of the considerations for ethically, safely and effectively communicating these issues are crosscutting.
Date:
Women constitute approximately half the people who live and work outside their country of origin. Women migrant workers are making substantial social and economic contributions to their communities and countries of origin and destination and can significantly increase their agency through the decision to migrate.
Date:
The 20th anniversary of the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda is a critical moment for the agenda and its relevance, which has been tested by the extensive impacts of COVID-19. This publication takes stock of the progress as well as the gaps in implementing WPS in the Asia Pacific region over the last 20 years, and builds upon the lessons learned to move the WPS agenda forward in the years to come.
Date:
Women and girls are part of the most vulnerable groups in times of humanitarian crisis such as COVID-19. To ensure all the information and available support are accessible to all, we need to ensure women’s representation and voices are visible at the decision-making level.
Date:
Women and girls face even more violence in times of humanitarian crises, such as this moment with COVID- 19 and past outbreaks when movement is restricted. Violence against women has been called a “shadow pandemic” because it has huge consequences on the health and well-being of women and girls, but they often suffer in the shadows which has socio-economic costs that will last beyond the pandemic.
Date:
Building on the seven Women's Empowerment Principles (WEPs), this tool will enable companies to assess their COVID-19 response and ensure they are supporting women during and beyond the crisis while safeguarding existing progress on women’s economic empowerment with both short-term and long-term actions.
Date:
This brief highlights emerging evidence of the impact of the recent global pandemic of COVID-19 on violence against women and girls . It makes recommendations to be considered by all sectors of society, from governments to international organizations and to civil society organizations, in order to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls, at the onset, during, and after the public health crisis, with examples of actions already taken.
Date:
[Key Advocacy Points from Asia and the Pacific] Emerging Gender Impacts - Exacerbated burdens of unpaid care work on women and girls : Where healthcare systems are stretched by efforts to contain outbreaks, care responsibilities are frequently “downloaded” onto women and girls, who usually bear responsibility for caring for ill family members and the elderly. The closure of schools further exacerbates the burden of unpaid care work on women and girls, who absorb the additional work.
Date:
The Gender Equality in Humanitarian Action (GIHA) Brief No. 2 features a gender equality checklist to support sectors in their disaster preparedness efforts for the monsoon and cyclone season in Cox’s Bazar.
Date:
India is one of the largest countries of origin, transit and destination for international migrants. A majority of Indian migrants in the Emigration Check Required category go to the Gulf Cooperation Council countries. Over the years, there has been an increasing trend of feminization of migration in the country, with women now accounting for 49 per cent of all migrants from India. Within this framework, domestic work is the largest sector driving international female labour migration. Migrant...