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“Participating in the Second Chance Education and Vocational Learning Programme has made me confident,” says Bulbul Akter, 24, a seamstress, turkey farmer and community outreach volunteer from Ukhiya Cox’s Bazar. “Now, I am known to my relatives and neighbours as a self-reliant woman. I am contributing to my family and the wider community, and I can support my daughter’s studies. I have requested that my two sisters also enrol in this programme.”
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Funded by the Swedish International Development Agency, the EmPower project aims to contribute to the implementation of climate change and disaster risk reduction actions in Asia and the Pacific that address the key drivers of gender-based vulnerabilities while enhancing human rights.
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UN Women Indonesia rolled out the project from June 2020 through May 2021. At the end of the project, 610 women benefited from the cash-based interventions, 100 women received advocacy and leadership training, and more than 100 individuals received knowledge on coordinated quality services to better support and empower women's migrant workers. In addition, 11 women’s crisis centers and shelters across the country were supported to ensure that services for women’s survivors of violence could continue during the pandemic.
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The World Economic Forum says that at the current rate of change, it will take 108 years to close the overall gender gap and 202 years to bring parity in the workplace. India has one of the lowest female labour force participation rates in the world and a majority of women work in the informal sector.
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The “UN Women impact stories series”, updated quarterly, illustrates the human impact of UN Women’s work across Asia and the Pacific, highlighting the partnerships that make this work possible. These stories share how we and our many partners are striding forward to realize a better world for women and girls—one of equality and empowerment because that is what we do and who we are, as a leader, mobilizer, convenor, and provider of programmes.
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Women and girls have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic’s social isolation and economic fallout. They face increased violence, unpaid care work, and other inequalities and violations of their rights.
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Summary on how United Nations in Thailand workings to improve girls and women lives and rights.
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Evaluation findings suggest that UN Women's collaboration with the Positive Women's Network (PWN+) from 2006 to 2011 was instrumental in providing a safespace, counseling, health and income generating services to women living with HIV.
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The call for a transformative framework to achieve women’s rights and gender equality comes in the midst of a global conversation about the legacy and next steps after the MDGs. Intergovernmental and UN-led processes are currently under way to inform and design a post-2015 development agenda and SDGs.
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International migration, especially of women migrant workers is driven by, among other factors: the search for decent jobs (Priority 1); access to resources including energy sources and water (Priorities 2 and 5); the urbanization drive that sees men and women and their families migrate internationally from rural areas in countries of origin to cities in countries of destination (Priority 3); food insecurity and unsustainable agricultural systems (Priority 4); and climate change and environmental degradation (linked to priorities 2, and 5-7).
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International Conventions and Human Rights Standards in the Framework:1. CEDAW: The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women2. GR No. 26: the CEDAW Committee’s General Recommendation No. 26 on Women Migrant Workers3. ICRMW: International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families4. GC No. 1: the Committee on Migrant Workers’ General Comment No. 1 on Migrant Domestic Workers
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International Conventions and Regional Human Rights Standards in the Framework: CEDAW: The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women GR No. 26: the CEDAW Committee’s General Recommendation No. 26 on Women Migrant Workers ICRMW: International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families GC No. 1: the Committee on Migrant Workers’ General Comment No. 1 on Migrant Domestic Workers ASEAN Declaration: The ASEAN Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers
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Women represent two thirds of the poor in Asia. Over 50% of all international migrants in Asia are women – the bulk of whom are employed as domestic workers.
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Women’s migration in search of decent work and sustainable livelihoods, to support themselves and their families has become an enduring structural feature of international migration, which is set to be one of the mega-trends of the 21st century. The “feminization” of migration is most visible in Asia, where women – especially young women - constitute over half of all migrant workers. In Nepal, women represent over 68% of migrants, while in Indonesia this figure is even higher – 83%. Domestic work is the dominant profession for migrant women with women representing 83% of domestic workers worldwide.
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The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), adopted on 18 December 1979 and entering into force on 3 September 1981 is an international Convention that is also known as the “International Bill of Rights for Women”. It is one of the core human rights treaties, and with 187 States Parties, CEDAW remains one of the most highly ratified UN Conventions. Governments who commit to CEDAW are legally bound to eliminate discrimination against women, including women migrant workers. The Convention comprehensively defines discrimination against women as including sexual and gender-based violence against women, and other human rights violations. CEDAW enjoys widespread support throughout Asia – for instance all Member States of ASEAN (the Association of Southeast Asian Nations) have ratified CEDAW. Several other Asian countries have also made the commitment to implement CEDAW. All Member States of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation have committed to CEDAW.
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In a village meeting in August 2010 in Maharashtra, India, a woman farmer in the presence of thirty women and twenty-one men said: “When the land is in my husband’s name, I am only a worker.
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Rural, indigenous people live in two simultaneous situations. While they have highly developed capabilities for management of biodiverse natural resources, they are lodged in a discriminated, excluded existence, away from the centre stage of economic and technological change.