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The Peace Village Initiative, implemented by the Wahid Foundation since 2017 with the support of UN Women and other donors, is an ambitious initiative that aims to address the drivers of extremism among women by mobilizing community members, especially women, to promote social cohesion across Java Island in Indonesia.
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This report presents novel research findings – possibly the first such robust findings to date – on the relationship between support for misogyny, violence against women, and extremist violence in Bangladesh, Indonesia and the Philippines.
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This report presents research findings on gender and violent extremism in the Philippines, Bangladesh, and Indonesia. The aim of the research is to examine women’s roles in supporting, countering, and preventing violent extremism and how gender identities and relations may be used to garner support for intolerant social attitudes and groups as well as recruitment to violent extremist groups.
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Violent extremism has emerged as one of the leading challenges to the realization of sustainable peace globally. Across South and South-East Asia, violent extremism poses a direct threat to inclusive development by fuelling intolerance, forcibly displacing communities, exacerbating cycles of insecurity and armed conflict, exploiting existing inequalities, and obstructing the enjoyment of human rights and the rule of law. Underpinning this violence are gender stereotypes that are used to radicalize and recruit men and women, as well as girls and boys, to violent extremist groups.
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The research found that common problems existed within the families, including psychosocial and socio-economic vulnerabilities, a lack of access to justice, and no gender-sensitive religious or other platforms for support. The research concludes that these issues must be addressed. Minimizing stigma toward the wives of men detained on terror-related charges and supporting them to prevent the radicalization of their children can limit their vulnerability to engaging in violent extremist activity themselves.
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This study in Bangladesh and Indonesia has identified the many ways in which women and men influence values, attitudes and behaviours within their communities, from raising awareness of violent extremism, challenging belief systems that cause harm to women and children, to advocating education for women and girls. Four key outcomes can be discerned from the research con-ducted across programme and non-programme sites in Bangla-desh and Indonesia...
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In 2017, UNHCR and UN Women partnered to conduct a gender analysis of the right to a nationality in Myanmar. This was implemented by the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC), along with local CSO The Seagull, the Statelessness Network Asia Pacific (SNAP) and the Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion (ISI). The report was launched on 7 March 2018 as part of a series of events celebrating International Women’s Day. Conducted in Mawlamyine, Mandalay and Yangon, the study included participants...
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The paper highlights the legal gap that still exist in violence against women in Asia that lead to create a culture of impunity in which the perpetrator go unpunished by reinforcing a message that he will not be held accountable for his action. Challenges in implementing human rights law in order to make rights to women and girls not meaningless still need to be endeavored in all the Asian countries. The lack of adequate laws and structure to safeguard witnesses and ensure their security, as...