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Child marriage takes away a girl’s right to safe and healthy childhood, quality and complete education that can lead to decent economic opportunities, and social and political empowerment. Pakistan has the 6th highest number of girls married before the age of 18 in the world. Child marriage is prevalent due to several reasons including deeply entrenched traditions and customs, poverty, lack of awareness and/or access to education, and lack of security.
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The linkages between organized crime, including trafficking in persons, and violent extremism are a global concern. These linkages are starting to receive some attention, but this is limited to specific conflict contexts such as Iraq and Syria. In recognition of the link between violent extremism and trafficking in persons and the gendered nature of both, the UN Security Council adopted its first resolution on trafficking in persons in areas affected by armed conflict in 2016 (UNSCR 2331). But overall, there is little understanding of the relationship between violent extremism and trafficking in persons, or of how gender informs this interaction.
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The COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting nationwide restricted mobility is exacerbating the pre-existing social and economic inequalities, adding more layers of barriers, discrimination and threats for women in their homes and communities. The brief reflects the situation and voices of women and gender diverse people from the ground, constantly battling against these challenges.
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Trafficking is prevalent across the Greater Mekong subregion, yet the specific gendered experiences of those affected remain underexplored. Relatively little is known about the extent to which initiatives aimed at prevention, return and response and reintegration are gender-responsive. This report aims to fill these gaps. It brings together a wide-ranging literature and policy review and primary qualitative data to provide insights into how gender and trafficking intersect across Cambodia, Myanmar and Thailand. It identifies a range of gaps and challenges and identifies priorities for future policy and programming.
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Pressure has been building on addressing the needs of conflict-related sexual violence (CRSV) survivors in Sri Lanka, but political will is needed to deal with CRSV in a cohesive manner. The proliferation of National Action Plans and policies does not ensure their implementation. Resources need to be allocated for the specific needs of CRSV survivors to be addressed. Cases of CRSV must be documented in a more systematic manner, maintaining the confidentiality of the survivor, so that...
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The Government of the United Kingdom Foreign & Commonwealth Office and UN Women Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific have joined together to work towards better addressing the needs of conflict-related sexual violence (CRSV) victims/survivors and their children, including through National Action Plans on Women, Peace and Security (NAPs-WPS)...
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Women and girls fear and experience various types of sexual violence in public spaces, from unwanted sexual remarks and touching to rape and femicide. It is a universal issue.
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The report specifically calls upon the Government of Afghanistan to acknowledge the commission of wartime atrocities, develop protection programs and support services for victims and witnesses of attacks against women, and foster an institutional culture in which women’s participation in the justice system, whether professionally or personally, is promoted and encouraged.
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A new UN study on men’s use of violence against women was launched at the Foreign Correspondents’ Club of Thailand on 10 September 2013. The study of over 10,000 men in Asia and the Pacific found that nearly half of those men interviewed reported using physical or sexual violence against a female partner, ranging from 26 percent to 80 percent across the sites. Nearly a quarter of men interviewed reported perpetrating rape against a woman or girl, ranging from 10 percent to 62 percent across the sites.
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This baseline study of UN Women’s anti-trafficking programme recognizes structural inequalities, vulnerabilities and lack of sustainable livelihoods as the chief causes of human trafficking.
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Though there is no uniformity in the practices being observed within Indian states to protect women from domestic violence, a number of them seem to be promising acts of change.
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Read this Resource Tool on how the Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act (PWDVA) safeguards women’s right to justice through protection officers and NGOs. The tool also contains information about civil and criminal procedure laws.
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Though there is no uniformity in the practices being observed within Indian states to protect women from domestic violence, a number of them seem to be promising acts of change.
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Preventing and Responding to Domestic Violence through a Multi-Sectoral Approach
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The study examines how safe the two city areas are for women and girls and explores the relationship between women’s fear of violence and their avoidance of specific public spaces.
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This guide introduces the key concepts of safe cities work and offers practical tools for how to begin building a safer, more inclusive city.
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The study examines the safety of women and girls in Thiruvananthapuram and Kozhikode cities in Kerala state of India.
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Fourth in the series of ‘Staying Alive’, this report tracks the implementation of the 2005 Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act.
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This report presents the external evaluation of the UNIFEM Regional Anti-Trafficking Programme (2000-2009) in Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Sri Lanka.
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This resource was developed by SANLAAP along with UNIFEM (now UN Women), to be used as a tool to ensure better care and protection of survivors of trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation.