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Building an equal and a just society requires inclusion of all voices and representation from all walks of life. It entails giving people from diverse and marginalized backgrounds an opportunity to be heard. Women, youth, marginalized communities, people with disabilities, and sexual minorities continue to be underrepresented in public forums, events, and webinars. We must recognize different expertise and experiences in our society, including differing views.
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In this edition: [*] Eliminating Gender-Based Violence in Cox’s Bazar was discussed during the 16 Days of Activism campaign [*] Acting against gender-based violence in Cox’s Bazar [*] Orange handprints to raise awareness against gender-based violence in Multi-Purpose Women’s Centres [*] Women and girls in Cox’s Bazar say "No to violence against women" and more...
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The purpose of this Gender Alert is to document and analyze the impact of the rapidly evolving Afghan context on women’s rights and gender equality. This Alert focuses on developments since the Taliban take-over of Kabul on 15 August 2021, shedding light on the impact of the current contextual dynamics on the rights of women and girls.
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Beyond Kabul: Women peacebuilders’ reflections on the peace process and the impact of COVID-19
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Bringing together the views of over 800 Afghan women, from eight provinces and various social groups, this study aims to highlight the perspectives of the Afghan women on the peace process, to better inform political elites and decision makers of their concerns; thus, facilitating informed decisions during the intra-Afghan peace negotiations with the Taliban.
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Women play diverse roles in the context of armed conflict; as culturally designated caregivers, women must struggle to support their families and keep their households together while the breadwinners fight, or are apprehended or killed. Women and girls are equally affected in a fragile environment where social services and other basic needs become harder/impossible to fulfil. As a primary provider, women are exposed to further abuse.
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This report tells UN Women’s story over the period 2019–2020. It shares how we and our many partners are striding forward to realize a better world for women and girls—one of equality and empowerment. Looking forward, we will draw on our full resources and experiences in protecting and advancing the rights of all women and girls. That is what we do and who we are, as a leader, mobilizer, convenor, provider of programmes, and partner for change.
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The Gender Equality Update 16 brings out the emerging issues and recommendations from rural women farmers, women entrepreneurs and feminist economists. The update also provides a summary of the UN socio-economic response framework to COVID-19.
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The paper highlights the legal gap that still exist in violence against women in Asia that lead to create a culture of impunity in which the perpetrator go unpunished by reinforcing a message that he will not be held accountable for his action. Challenges in implementing human rights law in order to make rights to women and girls not meaningless still need to be endeavored in all the Asian countries. The lack of adequate laws and structure to safeguard witnesses and ensure their security, as...
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This report is based on the participatory action research that was conducted over a period of 12 months by the Centre of Studies for Peace and Development (CEPAD) with support from UN Women...
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From agriculture to traditional crafts, rural women sustain the informal sector in a variety of ways.
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From agriculture to traditional crafts, rural women sustain the informal sector in a variety of ways. Sewa Bharat and UN Women have joined hands to build the capacities of rural, female informal sector workers.
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Though there is no uniformity in the practices being observed within Indian states to protect women from domestic violence, a number of them seem to be promising acts of change.
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Though there is no uniformity in the practices being observed within Indian states to protect women from domestic violence, a number of them seem to be promising acts of change.
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The paper by Savitri W. E. Goonesekere examines the evolving concept of substantive equality and its implications for South Asia – a region where, despite some gains, the stark reality of gender based discrimination is still all pervasive.
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The report of the Seventh South Asia Regional Ministerial Conference in Dhaka, Bangladesh presenting an analysis of the key points discussed particularly on violence against women and economic security and women’s rights in South Asia.
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A manual on ‘Ending Domestic Violence through Non-Violence’ by Lawyers Collective Women’s Rights Initiative (LCWRI) in association with the Ministry of Women and Child Development, Government of India & National Commission for Women.
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The Report of the Sixth South Asia Regional Ministerial Conference co-hosted by the Ministry of Women and ChildDevelopment, Government of India and UN Women present analyses of issues across the region.
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This is the first monitoring and evaluation report on the Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act (PWDVA) in India. It attempts to capture emerging trends in the implementation of the law and highlights best practices from different states.
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The Fifth South Asia Regional Ministerial Meeting – “Celebrating Beijing Plus Ten”, was as special as the year 2005 itself. A year of milestones for gender equality, it marks the tenth anniversary of the historic Fourth World Conference on Women at Beijing; 30 years since the First World Conference on Women at Mexico; and, five years since the Millennium Summit. Keeping alive the promise of Beijing, this regional review process, which began in 1996, is a collaborative undertaking involving all stakeholders, including Governments, NGOs, the SAARC secretariat, gender experts...