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On the afternoon of March 22, 2021, a massive fire broke out in the Rohingya refugee camps in Ukhiya, Cox’s Bazar. The fire quickly spread across three camps consuming shelters and personal belongings of refugees as well as essential facilities such as hospitals, primary health facilities, learning centers, and women friendly spaces in the camps.
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Case studies in this report provide entry points and lessons learned on how to adapt programming and integrate women and girls in the COVID-19 response and recovery efforts.
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The Philippines remains gravely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic with the highest number of COVID-19 cases in South East Asia, and the second highest number of COVID-19 related deaths. This third Gender Snapshot from UN Women Philippines captures the situation of women and girls in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic from the period of June to July 2020. Protection from gender-based violence, and threats to the safety of LGBTIQ...
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In the first six months of the COVID-19 pandemic, the disproportionate impact on women and girls has been severe across the region. As previously highlighted in a regional analysis, the pandemic has particularly affected women and girls by exacerbating burdens of unpaid care work, increasing risks of gender-based violence (GBV), impacting livelihoods of women disproportionately especially in the informal sector, and reducing access to sexual and reproductive health.
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In this edition; (*) UN Women and Rohingya women at the frontline of COVID-19 response (*) Honour in Transition: Changing gender norms among the Rohingya (*) UN Women and UNHCR sign an MOU on strengthening gender-responsive site management in Rohingya Refugee Camps in Cox’s Bazar and more...
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The Gender Alerts series highlights the disproportionate gender specific impacts of COVID-19 in Afghanistan, from the lack of services for survivors of violence to the challenges of building peace during a health crisis and a fast-paced rise in the burden of unpaid care work.
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In Indonesia, women make up the majority of frontline healthcare professionals and community health workers. At home, women also play important roles as caregivers for children, the sick, and elderly members of their families.
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Women and girls’ immediate and long-term needs must be addressed and integrated into Timor-Leste’s COVID-19 response, in order to ensure both women’s access to services and human rights, and to enable women to contribute to shaping the response.
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In March 2020, emerging gender impacts and trends were highlighted in an Advocacy Brief developed by GiHA resulting in key recommendations.
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This Note, the third in a four-part series, shows how the barriers women entrepreneurs already face in starting and retaining a business are likely to increase in the aftermath of COVID-19. Those barriers include less access than male entrepreneurs to information and communications technology, financial services and assets, legal rights, business management skills and networking opportunities.
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COVID-19 is both a health pandemic that is killing thousands and a socio-economic crisis that is threatening the welfare of millions. Although the pandemic affects people across all walks of life, certain groups are more impacted than others. This brief, developed by the UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific, highlights the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on certain groups of people and offers some key policy recommendations.
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Declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization, the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is already having major, differentiated impacts on women. The private sector not only has a responsibility to protect the rights of all its employees and workers and to support women across their entire value chains, but also directly benefits by doing so.
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The COVID-19 pandemic disproportionately affects women migrant workers across Asia and the Pacific, in particular those with irregular migration status. Concluding the four-part guidance note series, this paper focuses on the emerging impacts of the pandemic on women migrant workers and recommendations to support governments, donors, civil society organizations, employers and the private sector in addressing those impacts. Essentially, more assertive and collective efforts are needed to ensure migrant-inclusive and gender-responsive measures in preventing further spread of the virus.
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This report presents a snapshot of the gender dimensions of the socio-economic impacts of the pandemic and captures promising practices for integrating gender in preparedness and response planning while proposing potential and entry points to mitigate the socio-economic impacts for women and girls in the region. It discusses the impacts and the potential way forward on issues including women, peace and security, gender and disaster risk reduction, ending violence against women and women’s economic empowerment.
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COVID-19, the novel Corona Virus Disease that was first detected in China in November 2019, has now spread to 206 countries or regions. As of April 5, 2020, 1,203,485 cases have been reported worldwide with 64,784 confirmed fatalities. There is an unequivocal evidence that COVID-19 is not just a global public health emergency but is also leading the world to a major global, economic downturn, with potentially strong adverse impacts on the livelihoods of vulnerable groups.
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With the wor ld responding to the COVID-19 virus, it is important to consider response and recovery mechanisms through a gender lens. While wom en, as caregivers, breadwinners and health care workers, play critical roles in times of crisis, many of the impacts of COVID-19 are affect ing women the most, exacerbating pre-existing social and economic inequalities, barriers and discrimination in their homes and communities.
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This brief highlights emerging evidence of the impact of the recent global pandemic of COVID-19 on violence against women and girls . It makes recommendations to be considered by all sectors of society, from governments to international organizations and to civil society organizations, in order to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls, at the onset, during, and after the public health crisis, with examples of actions already taken.
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Women’s economic empowerment will be essential if we are to ensure that the economic recovery from COVID-19 in Asia and the Pacific is as rapid as possible and includes all members of society. In the first of this four-part series, this brief introduces a strong gender perspective to the COVID-19 crisis and response and provides recommendations on how to apply a gender-responsive approach to the post-pandemic challenges to ensure accelerated, inclusive and sustainable recovery.
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In countries across Asia-Pacific, the response to COVID-19 is escalating with serious implications for peace and security, and the rights of women and girls. The enactment of national emergency powers, introduction of military checkpoints and lockdowns, closed borders, and restrictions on citizens’ movement and speech, all mirror a governance context similar to that of a conflict setting. This brief introduces the issue, presents considerations of the implications of COVID-19 in the women, peace and security agenda and offers some recommendations on the way forward.
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They were developed on the basis of the IASC Policy Statement on Gender Equality in Humanitarian Action (November 2017)1, and in light of lessons learned from the Ebola and Zika outbreaks and emerging gender impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. The goal is to mobilize inter-agency support within the Nepal Humanitarian Country Team in ensuring these principles are reflected in the emergency response activities in support of the Government of Nepal.