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“Participating in the Second Chance Education and Vocational Learning Programme has made me confident,” says Bulbul Akter, 24, a seamstress, turkey farmer and community outreach volunteer from Ukhiya Cox’s Bazar. “Now, I am known to my relatives and neighbours as a self-reliant woman. I am contributing to my family and the wider community, and I can support my daughter’s studies. I have requested that my two sisters also enrol in this programme.”
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Funded by the Swedish International Development Agency, the EmPower project aims to contribute to the implementation of climate change and disaster risk reduction actions in Asia and the Pacific that address the key drivers of gender-based vulnerabilities while enhancing human rights.
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The note is intended to support universities and university administrators, UN staff working with universities in this area, civil society partners, students and other relevant stakeholders—particularly in middle- and low-income countries where there are few resources for addressing violence against women. Universities should adopt targeted measures to address the needs of specific groups, including those most vulnerable and at risk (e.g. students with disabilities, migrants, and those from ethnic minorities, lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgender, intersex, and queer (LGBTIQ) individuals).
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This Guidance Note on Gender-responsive conflict analysis initially developed in Afghanistan has global applicability. It provides recommendations on how to apply a gender lens in political and conflict analysis in a way that allows the integration of gender as a variable of power across a social, political, economic analysis of conflict as opposed to addressing issues specific to women and girls in siloed analysis. This approach reveals the critical links between gender dynamics of conflict and peacebuilding.
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UN Women Indonesia rolled out the project from June 2020 through May 2021. At the end of the project, 610 women benefited from the cash-based interventions, 100 women received advocacy and leadership training, and more than 100 individuals received knowledge on coordinated quality services to better support and empower women's migrant workers. In addition, 11 women’s crisis centers and shelters across the country were supported to ensure that services for women’s survivors of violence could continue during the pandemic.
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This guidance for Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) is an essential tool to make sure a coordinated response to VAW, including women migrant workers, is put in place. Because of the multi-faceted nature of VAW and the specific challenges and needs of women migrant workers, coordinated approaches to addressing it are considered more effective than when different actors work in isolation to address the issue.
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The current conflict and political uncertainty in Afghanistan has clear gendered impacts. Restrictive gender norms and harmful practices are being exacerbated. Women and girls are at risk of further marginalization and being left behind. It is critical that women’s voices continue to be consulted, amplified and inform humanitarian decision-making through their participation in humanitarian assessments. Given the current circumstances.
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The World Economic Forum says that at the current rate of change, it will take 108 years to close the overall gender gap and 202 years to bring parity in the workplace. India has one of the lowest female labour force participation rates in the world and a majority of women work in the informal sector.
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This Gender and COVID-19 training module introduce the impact of COVID-19 on women/gender from a Development aspect including Health, Economic, Women Peace and Security (WPS) and Social Cohesion perspective. With a number of gender related health issues exists in Myanmar, COVID-19 pandemic exacerbates negative impact on women and girls in different sectors including health and economic sector. In health sector, there are impacts on not only those who are seeking health services.
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The “UN Women impact stories series”, updated quarterly, illustrates the human impact of UN Women’s work across Asia and the Pacific, highlighting the partnerships that make this work possible. These stories share how we and our many partners are striding forward to realize a better world for women and girls—one of equality and empowerment because that is what we do and who we are, as a leader, mobilizer, convenor, and provider of programmes.
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[Infographics] Women who migrate for work contribute greatly to stronger societies and economies in both their countries of origin and their countries of destination. For many, the decision to work abroad involves prioritizing their families’ welfare over their own personal comfort and desires. Women generally have fewer options than men for regular migration, and are often employed in lower paid, informal sectors with few, if any, labour protections.
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These statistics set the tone for a series of conversations jointly hosted by UN Women and the French Embassy in Sri Lanka, in the broader context of COVID-19 and the parallel worsening of gender equality. In the course of the six discussions – each based on the thematic focus areas of the Generation Equality Forum – experts and activists repeatedly highlighted three underlying problems in relation to gender equality and women’s rights in Sri Lanka.
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In 2020, Bangladesh faced a double disaster Cyclone and COVID-19 in Khulna and Satkhira districts amongst the hardest hit. Thousands of families lost their livelihoods and incomes overnight. While the government provided direct assistance to those affected, many women and girls fell through the cracks. At the onset of the pandemic, UN Women expanded the group of NGOs that it worked with and created the Gender Monitoring Network (GMN), a network of 28 civil society organizations (CSOs) and women’s rights organizations. Organizations from the GMN supported UN Women in identifying vulnerable groups of women and girls, including transgender and sex workers, for unconditional cash assistance.
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This note provides guidance on the safe use of remote technologies to provide support to women migrant workers who are at risk of, or have experienced violence, harassment, abuse or exploitation. The provision of services through remote technologies is not new. However, various remote methods are increasingly being used as technological innovations evolve and they become more accessible.
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Women and girls have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic’s social isolation and economic fallout. They face increased violence, unpaid care work, and other inequalities and violations of their rights.
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The infographic was based on a policy research “Leveraging Digitalization to cope with COVID-19: An Indonesia case study on women-owned micro and small businesses” by UN Women in partnership with Pulse Lab Jakarta and Gojek, with the support of National Council for Financial Inclusion of Indonesia (S-DNKI).
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These guidelines are intended to promote best practices for responsible, ethical and safe representation and reporting of violence against women (VAW) and violence against children (VAC) by media practitioners. While the causes, risk factors, prevalence, patterns and consequences of violence against women and violence against children may differ, many of the considerations for ethically, safely and effectively communicating these issues are crosscutting.
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Women constitute approximately half the people who live and work outside their country of origin. Women migrant workers are making substantial social and economic contributions to their communities and countries of origin and destination and can significantly increase their agency through the decision to migrate.
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The infographic was based on the survey on the socio-economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on women and men launched through SMS messages via Indosat Ooredoo mobile network, during April and July 2020 to collect data from randomly selected cellphone users with a link to a web-based survey. The report “Counting the Costs of COVID-19: Assessing the Impact on Gender and the Achievement of the SDGs in Indonesia” reveals how COVID-19 is exposing women’s vulnerabilities to...
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The 20th anniversary of the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda is a critical moment for the agenda and its relevance, which has been tested by the extensive impacts of COVID-19. This publication takes stock of the progress as well as the gaps in implementing WPS in the Asia Pacific region over the last 20 years, and builds upon the lessons learned to move the WPS agenda forward in the years to come.