41
results found
1 - 20 of 41 Results
Date:
This book is a compendium consolidating 8 good practices from ASEAN member states, organized along the four Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 priorities of understanding disaster risk, strengthening risk governance, investing in DRR for resilience, and enhancing disaster preparedness for building back better.
Date:
The note is intended to support universities and university administrators, UN staff working with universities in this area, civil society partners, students and other relevant stakeholders—particularly in middle- and low-income countries where there are few resources for addressing violence against women. Universities should adopt targeted measures to address the needs of specific groups, including those most vulnerable and at risk (e.g. students with disabilities, migrants, and those from ethnic minorities, lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgender, intersex, and queer (LGBTIQ) individuals).
Date:
This Guidance Note on Gender-responsive conflict analysis initially developed in Afghanistan has global applicability. It provides recommendations on how to apply a gender lens in political and conflict analysis in a way that allows the integration of gender as a variable of power across a social, political, economic analysis of conflict as opposed to addressing issues specific to women and girls in siloed analysis. This approach reveals the critical links between gender dynamics of conflict and peacebuilding.
Date:
This publication presents highlights of results achieved under the regional project, “Stepping Up Solutions to Eliminate Violence against Women and Girls in Asia and the Pacific”. The project literally stepped up solutions by bringing together a wealth of evidence, knowledge and innovative approaches those involved in ending VAWG for good. The project united men and boys, teachers and students in schools and universities, local, national and regional governments.
Date:
This guidance for Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) is an essential tool to make sure a coordinated response to VAW, including women migrant workers, is put in place. Because of the multi-faceted nature of VAW and the specific challenges and needs of women migrant workers, coordinated approaches to addressing it are considered more effective than when different actors work in isolation to address the issue.
Date:
The current conflict and political uncertainty in Afghanistan has clear gendered impacts. Restrictive gender norms and harmful practices are being exacerbated. Women and girls are at risk of further marginalization and being left behind. It is critical that women’s voices continue to be consulted, amplified and inform humanitarian decision-making through their participation in humanitarian assessments. Given the current circumstances.
Date:
The ASEAN Regional Framework on Protection, Gender, and Inclusion in Disaster Management 2021-2025 (ARF-PGI) aims to articulate a common vision for promoting PGI in disaster management in the ASEAN region, in line with One ASEAN One Response. The Framework aims to support the implementation of the ASEAN Agreement on Disaster Management and Emergency Response (AADMER) Work Programme 2021-2025 and other regional declarations and plans by: Consolidating regional commitments across sectors on...
Date:
This brief was developed with an aim to capture the experiences and lessons learned from piloting gender responsive budgeting (GRB) initiatives in Bac Giang in 2018 and 2019. It presents the positive changes made and challenges encountered during the processes of the implementation and make proposals on how to promote GRB practices in socio-economic development programmes in the community going forward.
Date:
Stateless women and girls experience particular gender-related barriers, and the pandemic further exacerbated their vulnerability. Increased sexual and gender-based violence, socioeconomic impacts, school dropouts due to excess demands at home, forced marriage and early pregnancy are some of the major factors that continue to threaten to reverse hard-won gains on gender equality.
Date:
An equal and inclusive society demands inclusion of voices from all paths. The checklist, ‘Diversity in Dialogue’ includes detailed steps to help organizers and panelists to ensure multiple arguments, expertise and inclusion in public forums. UN Nepal’s Gender Theme Group collaborated with International Development Partners – Gender Equality and Social Inclusion Group to develop the checklist. UN in Nepal and more than 17 International Development Partners have signed the pledge. Let’s make a conscious choice today to promote inclusive representation.
Date:
This note provides guidance on the safe use of remote technologies to provide support to women migrant workers who are at risk of, or have experienced violence, harassment, abuse or exploitation. The provision of services through remote technologies is not new. However, various remote methods are increasingly being used as technological innovations evolve and they become more accessible.
Date:
Adolescents and youth are a vital positive force in emergency preparedness and response. While they have wide-ranging capacities they also have unique needs, and too often adolescents are lost between programming for children and programming for older adults. In particular, adolescent girls are disproportionately affected by crises. Compared to boys, girls are less likely to be able to meet their basic needs.
Date:
In July 2019, the Inter-Agency Standing Committee published Guidelines on the ‘Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action’ which set out essential actions that humanitarian actors must take in order to effectively identify and respond to the needs and rights of persons with disabilities.
Date:
These guidelines are intended to promote best practices for responsible, ethical and safe representation and reporting of violence against women (VAW) and violence against children (VAC) by media practitioners. While the causes, risk factors, prevalence, patterns and consequences of violence against women and violence against children may differ, many of the considerations for ethically, safely and effectively communicating these issues are crosscutting.
Date:
Along with the growing conversation around gender lens investment (GLI), there is a common perception that GLI concept is a niche practice of women investing in women to achieve equal access to capital.However, GLI practice is so much more than this.
Date:
Women constitute approximately half the people who live and work outside their country of origin. Women migrant workers are making substantial social and economic contributions to their communities and countries of origin and destination and can significantly increase their agency through the decision to migrate.
Date:
The 20th anniversary of the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda is a critical moment for the agenda and its relevance, which has been tested by the extensive impacts of COVID-19. This publication takes stock of the progress as well as the gaps in implementing WPS in the Asia Pacific region over the last 20 years, and builds upon the lessons learned to move the WPS agenda forward in the years to come.
Date:
Building on the seven Women's Empowerment Principles (WEPs), this tool will enable companies to assess their COVID-19 response and ensure they are supporting women during and beyond the crisis while safeguarding existing progress on women’s economic empowerment with both short-term and long-term actions.
Date:
The World Health Organisation (WHO) declared the global pandemic with the novel strain of Corona virus (COVID-19 or SARS-CoV-2) on 11 March 2020. In Vietnam, Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc announced an acute respiratory infection caused by a new strain of Corona virus (on February 20, 2020). The Government, Ministry of Health, Ministry of Defense, Ministry of Public Security and other ministries, sectors and provinces have made great efforts to prevent and minimise the spread of the disease.
Date:
Women, the elderly, adolescents, youth, and children, persons with disabilities, indigenous populations, refugees, migrants, and minorities experience the highest degree of socio-economic marginalization. Marginalized people become even more vulnerable in emergencies. This is due to factors such as their lack of access to effective surveillance and early-warning systems, and health services. The COVID-19 outbreak is predicted to have significant impacts on various sectors.