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This report identifies both the persistent trends and changing gender dynamics of violent extremism in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, based on an expert survey and interview research conducted between July and November 2021. It examined how and to what extent misogyny and hostile beliefs are fuelling violent extremism in the Southeast Asian region during the pandemic, the degree to which misogyny and hostile beliefs in the ASEAN region are fuelling violent extremism, and how these manifest themselves in the offline space.
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Over one year into the COVID-19 pandemic, secondary waves continue to unfurl across fragile economic and social landscapes, with the most devastating consequences for individuals and groups with pre-existing vulnerabilities. As lockdowns and restrictions persist, inequalities that underscore the pervasive impacts of the pandemic threaten to further exacerbate conditions for those most marginalized and vulnerable. Disproportionate increases in inequalities for women across health.
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This report was produced by the Asia-Pacific Gender in Humanitarian Action Working Group (co-chaired by UN Women, CARE International and OCHA), Gender-Based Violence Area of Responsibility, and Voice. This work has been made possible by supplementary funding from the Government of Japan.
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This report presents research findings on gender and violent extremism in the Philippines, Bangladesh, and Indonesia. The aim of the research is to examine women’s roles in supporting, countering, and preventing violent extremism and how gender identities and relations may be used to garner support for intolerant social attitudes and groups as well as recruitment to violent extremist groups.
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Violent extremism has emerged as one of the leading challenges to the realization of sustainable peace globally. Across South and South-East Asia, violent extremism poses a direct threat to inclusive development by fuelling intolerance, forcibly displacing communities, exacerbating cycles of insecurity and armed conflict, exploiting existing inequalities, and obstructing the enjoyment of human rights and the rule of law. Underpinning this violence are gender stereotypes that are used to radicalize and recruit men and women, as well as girls and boys, to violent extremist groups.