26
results found
1 - 20 of 26 Results
Date:
There are many benefits from partnering with UN Women. To recognize valuable work and generous contributions, UN Women provides communications and public relations support for maximum visibility of the partnerships. In addition to global recognition and visibility, partners have the opportunity to build corporate networks and relationships with like-minded businesses, philanthropic leaders, and client bases in UN Women-led initiatives such as the Generation Equality Forum, HeForShe, the Unstereotype Alliance, and the Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs). Our private sector partners may also experience positive effects on their overall businesses through collaborating with UN Women, for example, higher sales, stronger customer and supplier relationships, and a boost to employee morale and loyalty.
Date:
UN Women and UNDP have piloted a training programme on Non-Violent Communication – a method which has found success in international mediation and conflict resolution settings – in Bangladesh, the Maldives and Sri Lanka. The project was generously supported by the Government of Australia and the European Union. This brief provides an overview of the approaches used in the pilot project and presents results from the evaluations of the trainings.
Date:
This report identifies both the persistent trends and changing gender dynamics of violent extremism in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, based on an expert survey and interview research conducted between July and November 2021. It examined how and to what extent misogyny and hostile beliefs are fuelling violent extremism in the Southeast Asian region during the pandemic, the degree to which misogyny and hostile beliefs in the ASEAN region are fuelling violent extremism, and how these manifest themselves in the offline space.
Date:
The Peace Village Initiative, implemented by the Wahid Foundation since 2017 with the support of UN Women and other donors, is an ambitious initiative that aims to address the drivers of extremism among women by mobilizing community members, especially women, to promote social cohesion across Java Island in Indonesia.
Date:
Over one year into the COVID-19 pandemic, secondary waves continue to unfurl across fragile economic and social landscapes, with the most devastating consequences for individuals and groups with pre-existing vulnerabilities. As lockdowns and restrictions persist, inequalities that underscore the pervasive impacts of the pandemic threaten to further exacerbate conditions for those most marginalized and vulnerable. Disproportionate increases in inequalities for women across health.
Date:
This report was produced by the Asia-Pacific Gender in Humanitarian Action Working Group (co-chaired by UN Women, CARE International and OCHA), Gender-Based Violence Area of Responsibility, and Voice. This work has been made possible by supplementary funding from the Government of Japan.
Date:
Stateless women and girls experience particular gender-related barriers, and the pandemic further exacerbated their vulnerability. Increased sexual and gender-based violence, socioeconomic impacts, school dropouts due to excess demands at home, forced marriage and early pregnancy are some of the major factors that continue to threaten to reverse hard-won gains on gender equality.
Date:
Women and girls have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic’s social isolation and economic fallout. They face increased violence, unpaid care work, and other inequalities and violations of their rights.
Date:
Adolescents and youth are a vital positive force in emergency preparedness and response. While they have wide-ranging capacities they also have unique needs, and too often adolescents are lost between programming for children and programming for older adults. In particular, adolescent girls are disproportionately affected by crises. Compared to boys, girls are less likely to be able to meet their basic needs.
Date:
In order to become a Peace Village, members within a community commit to promoting and fostering tolerance and peace within their communities. Starting with making peace within the family, members then agree on guidelines to enhance social cohesion in the community.
Date:
In July 2019, the Inter-Agency Standing Committee published Guidelines on the ‘Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action’ which set out essential actions that humanitarian actors must take in order to effectively identify and respond to the needs and rights of persons with disabilities.
Date:
Earlier this year, UN Women Asia and the Pacific and World Design Organization (WDO) “sat together” virtually to collaborate on the persistent issue of violence against women and girls in the region.
Date:
This training package on Gender and Preventing Violent Extremism is designed to increase the understanding of the critical role gender can play in understanding, addressing and preventing violent extremism (PVE). It is intended to support women’s organisations and civil society in their ongoing work on PVE, and related fields of women, peace and security. The training package is designed for use in Indonesia and Bangladesh, as well as South and Southeast Asia.
Date:
Supported by photos, data, infographics, and individual impact stories, the annual report highlights key achievements of the 18 active projects in 2019. It offers a snapshot of the impact the global pandemic caused by COVID-19 on grantees and the populations they serve, and the ways they are responding to it. Finally, it presents the results from its latest efforts to accelerate progress by fostering innovation and peer learning.
Date:
This report tells UN Women’s story over the period 2019–2020. It shares how we and our many partners are striding forward to realize a better world for women and girls—one of equality and empowerment. Looking forward, we will draw on our full resources and experiences in protecting and advancing the rights of all women and girls. That is what we do and who we are, as a leader, mobilizer, convenor, provider of programmes, and partner for change.
Date:
This brief explores recent research, which examines the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of women and men students of two universities in northern Bangladesh. It found that young women and men in northern Bangladesh identify gender equality and equal opportunities for women and men as the single most critical element for social cohesion in Bangladesh.
Date:
The linkages between organized crime, including trafficking in persons, and violent extremism are a global concern. These linkages are starting to receive some attention, but this is limited to specific conflict contexts such as Iraq and Syria. In recognition of the link between violent extremism and trafficking in persons and the gendered nature of both, the UN Security Council adopted its first resolution on trafficking in persons in areas affected by armed conflict in 2016 (UNSCR 2331). But overall, there is little understanding of the relationship between violent extremism and trafficking in persons, or of how gender informs this interaction.
Date:
This report presents novel research findings – possibly the first such robust findings to date – on the relationship between support for misogyny, violence against women, and extremist violence in Bangladesh, Indonesia and the Philippines.
Date:
This report presents research findings on gender and violent extremism in the Philippines, Bangladesh, and Indonesia. The aim of the research is to examine women’s roles in supporting, countering, and preventing violent extremism and how gender identities and relations may be used to garner support for intolerant social attitudes and groups as well as recruitment to violent extremist groups.
Date:
Violent extremism has emerged as one of the leading challenges to the realization of sustainable peace globally. Across South and South-East Asia, violent extremism poses a direct threat to inclusive development by fuelling intolerance, forcibly displacing communities, exacerbating cycles of insecurity and armed conflict, exploiting existing inequalities, and obstructing the enjoyment of human rights and the rule of law. Underpinning this violence are gender stereotypes that are used to radicalize and recruit men and women, as well as girls and boys, to violent extremist groups.