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“Participating in the Second Chance Education and Vocational Learning Programme has made me confident,” says Bulbul Akter, 24, a seamstress, turkey farmer and community outreach volunteer from Ukhiya Cox’s Bazar. “Now, I am known to my relatives and neighbours as a self-reliant woman. I am contributing to my family and the wider community, and I can support my daughter’s studies. I have requested that my two sisters also enrol in this programme.”
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This report has been conducted during the first year of the ‘Master Plan on Socio-economic Development of Ethnic Minorities and Mountainous Areas 2021-2030’ and compiled by the Institute for Social Development Studies (ISDS) and the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women in Viet Nam (UN Women).
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UN Women and UNDP have piloted a training programme on Non-Violent Communication – a method which has found success in international mediation and conflict resolution settings – in Bangladesh, the Maldives and Sri Lanka. The project was generously supported by the Government of Australia and the European Union. This brief provides an overview of the approaches used in the pilot project and presents results from the evaluations of the trainings.
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This report identifies both the persistent trends and changing gender dynamics of violent extremism in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, based on an expert survey and interview research conducted between July and November 2021. It examined how and to what extent misogyny and hostile beliefs are fuelling violent extremism in the Southeast Asian region during the pandemic, the degree to which misogyny and hostile beliefs in the ASEAN region are fuelling violent extremism, and how these manifest themselves in the offline space.
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The Peace Village Initiative, implemented by the Wahid Foundation since 2017 with the support of UN Women and other donors, is an ambitious initiative that aims to address the drivers of extremism among women by mobilizing community members, especially women, to promote social cohesion across Java Island in Indonesia.
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The brief showcases the contributions of UN Women Viet Nam in supporting and working with the Government of Viet Nam, civil society, and other stakeholders to advance gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls in Viet Nam. The brief is meant to be accessible to any reader by providing an introduction to UN Women and what we do; by sharing the about impact on 4 areas of our work: Policy Advocacy, Programmes, Coordination, and Outreach.
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UNODC and UN Women jointly developed three training modules aiming to strengthen the capacity of law enforcement to apply a gender-responsive and victim centered approach to carry out investigations related to trafficking in persons and other criminal activities.
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The fall of Afghanistan’s government to Taliban rule has further limited the ability of women and girls to exercise their rights, forcing many to flee their homes, seeking safety either elsewhere within the country or in neighbouring countries. This factsheet examines the needs, fears, and barriers encountered by Afghan women and girls who are internally displaced or who have fled abroad. It is the first in a series that will examine the changing situation in Afghanistan as additional data become available. It was produced by the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).
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This is the third edition of UN Women Indonesia’s newsletter, capturing a series of initiatives from October 2021 to January 2022. During this time, UN Women created a new partnership with the Government Investment Center to accelerate the economic empowerment of women's ultra-micro businesses in Indonesia.
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This guidance for Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) is an essential tool to make sure a coordinated response to VAW, including women migrant workers, is put in place. Because of the multi-faceted nature of VAW and the specific challenges and needs of women migrant workers, coordinated approaches to addressing it are considered more effective than when different actors work in isolation to address the issue.
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Skills development is key to economic empowerment of women migrant workers and improvements of their lives in Thailand and after returning to their countries of origin. Especially during the COVID-19 pandemic, skills development become more necessary and should be given to women migrant workers to overcome inequalities in economic and social development which are increasingly exacerbated. Skills development can improve productivity and help women migrant workers diversify their employment opportunities enhancing their possibilities to secure employment during the crisis and as part of recovery.
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[Infographics] Women who migrate for work contribute greatly to stronger societies and economies in both their countries of origin and their countries of destination. For many, the decision to work abroad involves prioritizing their families’ welfare over their own personal comfort and desires. Women generally have fewer options than men for regular migration, and are often employed in lower paid, informal sectors with few, if any, labour protections.
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The Safe and Fair Project, in particular, focuses on addressing the needs of women especially women migrant workers and women in informal employment in this policy document while advocacy interventions of the G20 project target other marginalized groups such as people with disabilities and ethnic minority groups. The interventions on gender equality, gender and labour migration are in line with Viet Nam’s commitments on these issues through ratification of International Labour Standards, UN CEDAW and at ASEAN level (ASEAN Consensus, ASEAN Declaration on Ending violence against women among others).
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While different social forces drive women to migrate abroad for work, the most common reason they do is economic. Having few livelihood options, women often seek work opportunities elsewhere to improve their family’s economic conditions. Beyond fulfilling women’s economic needs, migration can also provide them with opportunities to escape deeply entrenched discrimination and gender inequalities, such as sexual and gender-based violence, non-recognition of women’s work, and...
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This note provides guidance on the safe use of remote technologies to provide support to women migrant workers who are at risk of, or have experienced violence, harassment, abuse or exploitation. The provision of services through remote technologies is not new. However, various remote methods are increasingly being used as technological innovations evolve and they become more accessible.
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This brief provides guidance on the provision of remote services to women migrant workers who are at risk of, or subjected to violence. The brief is based on international principles and standards of service provision for women survivors of violence , together with emerging practice and knowledge on how these can be delivered remotely. The brief complements the 16 Essentials for Quality Multisectoral Service Provision to Women Migrant Workers Subject to Violence .
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This is the second edition of UN Women Indonesia’s newsletter, capturing a series of initiatives during Q4 2020 - Q1 2021 and in support of International Women’s Day.
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This glossary serves as a guide for journalists, researchers, trainers and other stakeholders who conduct trainings or write about women’s labour migration, and who write about violence against women in the context of migration. Language used in different communication materials and trainings puts forward specific positions and impressions, including at times perpetuating stereotypes. Thus, it is crucial to be clear about terms and definitions related to women migrant workers.
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In order to become a Peace Village, members within a community commit to promoting and fostering tolerance and peace within their communities. Starting with making peace within the family, members then agree on guidelines to enhance social cohesion in the community.
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Joint UN Programme, Governance of Labour Migration in South and South-East Asia (GOALS), a three-year programme (August 2020 – July 2023) which is implemented by the International Organization for Migration (IOM), International Labour Organization (ILO) and the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) and supported by the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC).