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This publication showcases the results of Rapid Gender Assessment surveys (RGAs) on the impact of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in seven countries in Asia and the Pacific. For some of these countries, this is the second round of RGAs and thus these findings may follow up those of “Unlocking the Lockdown”. The report is meant to be a statistical snapshot that could inform responses to the crisis but is not meant to provide policy recommendations or analyze the policy context in each country.
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Historically, gender norms, behaviours and social relations have played a big part in disadvantaging women economically. Institutions, systems and structures often restrict women’s economic opportunities, while gender roles and status can limit women’s voices and choices when it comes to household and community decisions. Participating in economic activities allows women to effect positive changes in their own lives, and communities, contributing to positive effects for the whole...
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This report provides a summary of the key findings and recommendations from the rapid safety and discrimination assessments carried out in 22 market locations across Fiji, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu. The assessments revealed challenges faced by women market vendors around their personal safety. Safe, accessible and inclusive work places are critical for women’s economic empowerment. The assessment results are meant to inform a range of Markets for Change (M4C) project stakeholders...
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This study set out to map, document and understand the relative vulnerability of municipal markets and their vendors, farmers and wider communities to climate change risks. The outcomes are practical measures and policy recommendations that can be implemented by UN Women’s Markets for Change project, municipalities and other relevant stakeholders to reduce this vulnerability and to prepare for disasters.
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This study set out to map, document and understand the relative vulnerability of municipal markets and their vendors, farmers and wider communities to climate change risks. The outcomes are practical measures and policy recommendations that can be implemented by UN Women’s Markets for Change project, municipalities and other relevant stakeholders to reduce this vulnerability and to prepare for disasters.
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The Getting Started Toolkit was developed to assist in getting the women vendors organised and empowered to engage in dialogue with the Market Vendors Association and the Market Management. The toolkit was developed in consultation with the Suva Market Vendors and the Sigatoka Market Vendors.
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A snapshot of UN Women’s Markets for Change project in the Solomon Islands delivered by the Fiji Multi-Country Office. Funded largely by the Australian Government, the project works with two major markets in Solomon Islands, as well as 18 others in Fiji and Vanuatu, to help ensure they are safe, inclusive and non-discriminatory. Markets are an essential source of income for many Solomon Islands households and women make up the majority of market vendors; despite this women are not usually...
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A snapshot of UN Women’s Markets for Change project delivered by the Fiji Multi-Country Office. Funded largely by the Australian Government, the project works with 20 market sites across Fiji Solomon Islands and Vanuatu to help ensure they are safe, inclusive and non-discriminatory. Markets are an essential source of income for many Pacific households and women make up the majority of market vendors; despite this women are not usually involved in the decision-making processes that shape...
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For PICTs, expanding and modernising their energy sector is vital since the limited availability of energy constrains human and economic development. Insufficient and unreliable power supplies can limit industrial production, while the lack of modern energy services can prevent the realisation of basic human needs, such as education, health, and communication. Furthermore, access to energy is not only a catalyst for development but it can also be a springboard for promoting gender equality and women’s empowerment. Without access to modern energy services, women and girls spend most of their day performing basic subsistence...
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Women’s economic empowerment is fundamentally about rights and equitable societies, yet women and their views, priorities and skills are often excluded from decision-making processes that shape development. Women in the Pacific region are more vulnerable than men to the impacts...
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As a group of small and geographically dispersed countries far from international markets, economic growth across the Pacific region is often uneven. While the World Bank considers Nauru and Palau to be upper middle income countries, the United Nations classifies Kiribati, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and Tuvalu as “least developed countries” based on their low incomes, economic vulnerability and weak human resources. Pacific populations are mainly rural and rely largely on subsistence activities: around 84% of women and 71% of men are involved in the subsistence or informal economies, work for family or are self-employed, and are therefore classed as vulnerable workers. Many of these activities fall outside the formal economy and are therefore not represented through more traditional economic measures such as gross domestic product...
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Participating in economic activities allows women to effect positive changes in their own lives and their communities, with positive ripple effects for the whole nation. Historically, gendered norms, behaviours and social relations have played a big part in disadvantaging women economically. Institutions, systems and structures often restrict women’s economic opportunities, while gendered roles and status can limit women’s voices and choices when it comes to household and community decisions. Women often also have reduced access to education and skills, as well as other resources such as credit and land ...
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The report is based on a feasibility study of the current Market Infrastructure of the 10 Markets in Fiji.
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This handbook has been designed to assist Fiji local government, city councils, town councils and market authorities who are responsible for managing marketplaces, to improve their marketplaces. This handbook has been designed to especially capture issues which pertain to the needs and wellbeing of women market vendors, who make up the bulk of vendors across Fiji. The handbook is to be used in conjunction with a consultative process between market vendors and market authorities, to ensure a more positive and conducive environment for all is achieved.
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A detailed survey of market managerial staff at nine of Fiji’s thirteen municipal markets whereby approximately one hundred and fifty questions were designed regarding infrastructural and socioeconomic issues facing market workers. The nine surveyed markets were Sigatoka, Nausori, Rakiraki, Ba, Tavua, Lautoka, Nadi, Namaka, Labasa and the summary captured vary considerably in size, demographic characteristics, and the complexity of infrastructure and trade-related social networks.
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The report is based on the economic analysis of four markets (Suva, Nausori, Sigatoka and Labasa) in Fiji
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The Melanesian Markets Report consists of the Market Profiles in the 3 Melanesian Countries (Fiji, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu). The report addresses the markets and culture, location of markets, size and density of markets, health and hygiene, wholesalong, wealth creation and market governance.
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The Melanesian Markets Report consists of the Market Profiles in the 3 Melanesian Countries (Fiji, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu). The report addresses the markets and culture, location of markets, size and density of markets, health and hygiene, wholesalong, wealth creation and market governance.
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The analysis is based on a survey of vendors in several markets located in the Solomon Islands (Honiara) and Papua New Guinea (Port Moresby and Kundiawa).The performance of markets in terms of employment and income/earnings generation, providing earnings for people who lack alternative employment (expressed as number of jobs created and associated earnings) and the return on capital employed within the market, ie profits after an allowance is made for a basic wage, providing funds that can be reinvested in business growth.