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UN Women Pacific Newsletter Issue# 3
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The issue of domestic violence has emerged as one of the primary public policy concerns in countries around the world. Countries in the ASEAN region have embarked on important initiatives in order to address the issue of domestic violence. It is in this context that sharing “good practices” and discussing comparative perspectives from initiatives around the world has provided recommendations and a template for developing common regional standards.
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The paper by Savitri W. E. Goonesekere examines the evolving concept of substantive equality and its implications for South Asia – a region where, despite some gains, the stark reality of gender based discrimination is still all pervasive.
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The Report of the Sixth South Asia Regional Ministerial Conference co-hosted by the Ministry of Women and ChildDevelopment, Government of India and UN Women present analyses of issues across the region.
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Second in a series of Staying Alive reports, this report has collated information on the establishment of infrastructure under PWDVA, maps emerging – and sometimes ad-hoc – practices that have been adopted to cover up silences in the law.
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This holistic overview of the status of women in South Asia since 2005 analyses the latest trends and challenges, in relation to violence against women, economic and political empowerment of women, disaster preparedness, and health.
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The handbook reflects actual needs as per the law enforcement agencies to prevent trafficking of women and children, and rehabilitate them. Trafficking does not mean prostitution. They are not synonymous. In understanding trafficking, one should delink it from prostitution. As per the existing law, Immoral Traffic (Prevention) Act 1956 (ITPA) prostitution becomes an offence when there is commercial exploitation of a person. If a woman or child is sexually exploited and any person gains out of the same, it amounts to commercial sexual exploitation (CSE), which is a legally punishable offence wherein the culpability lies against all
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A comparative analysis of the application of the Convention on Elimination of all Forms of Dicrimination Against Women in Bangladesh, India and Pakistan, the report highlights some of the complexities in applying the Convention in countries where Islamic Law is still applicable.
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The report analyses and presents proceedings from a fiveday South Asia Training of Trainers on CEDAW organized by UNIFEM (now UN Women) and Partners for Law and Development (PLD) in September 2006.
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An important tool for judges, lawyers and law students that covers the ratification of CEDAW, reporting procedures, and analyses how it could be implemented into domestic legal systems.
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A comprehensive analytical report that maps the situation and status of women in South Asia, within the framework of 12 critical areas of concern identified by the Beijing Platform.
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The Fifth South Asia Regional Ministerial Meeting – “Celebrating Beijing Plus Ten”, was as special as the year 2005 itself. A year of milestones for gender equality, it marks the tenth anniversary of the historic Fourth World Conference on Women at Beijing; 30 years since the First World Conference on Women at Mexico; and, five years since the Millennium Summit. Keeping alive the promise of Beijing, this regional review process, which began in 1996, is a collaborative undertaking involving all stakeholders, including Governments, NGOs, the SAARC secretariat, gender experts...
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The publication examines a unique accountability mechanism to track the implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW).
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All SAARC countries have ratified the UN Convention on Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, the key international human rights instrument on women's status. The Convention (CEDAW) recognises women's right to equal opportunities and life chances in the family, the community and within all countries that belong to the international community. When SAARC countries ratified the Convention they accepted binding obligations in international law to implement this Convention nationally. Though a particular government holding office at a particular time ratified the Convention, the Convention is an international treaty that binds the State and all successive governments. CEDAW has to be implemented through laws, policies...
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This resource book on the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) developed by ‘Partners for Law in Development’ (PLD) examines the significance of CEDAW with respect to human rights laws.