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This book is a compendium consolidating 8 good practices from ASEAN member states, organized along the four Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 priorities of understanding disaster risk, strengthening risk governance, investing in DRR for resilience, and enhancing disaster preparedness for building back better.
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16 things you can do to help end violence against women and girls
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This CEDAW-based legal review of the Magna Carta of migrant workers and the anti-trafficking laws in the Philippines is indispensable to give concrete recommendations on improving laws that protect women migrant workers. It aims to identify gender discrimination in laws and underscore state obligations to address existing gender discrimination in laws.
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Summary on how United Nations in Thailand workings to improve girls and women lives and rights.
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From agriculture to traditional crafts, rural women sustain the informal sector in a variety of ways.
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Evaluation findings suggest that UN Women's collaboration with the Positive Women's Network (PWN+) from 2006 to 2011 was instrumental in providing a safespace, counseling, health and income generating services to women living with HIV.
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The call for a transformative framework to achieve women’s rights and gender equality comes in the midst of a global conversation about the legacy and next steps after the MDGs. Intergovernmental and UN-led processes are currently under way to inform and design a post-2015 development agenda and SDGs.
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This publication is meant to serve as a ready reference on the country-specific legal protections that exist for women migrant workers in source and destination countries in the programmeme countries of UN Women’s Asia & Arab States Regional programmeme on Empowering Women Migrant Workers in Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Jordan, Lao PDR, Nepal, Philippines. In addition, destination countries and territories such as Bahrain, Hong Kong SAR, UAE, Singapore and Thailand were included.
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The research on return and reintegration of migrant workers conducted by Unlad Kagayad Migration Services Foundation is part of UN Women action research project on Return and Reintegration: Women’s participation and Gender-Responsive Interventions. The research is conducted as a form of evaluation of the gender sensitive response on Unlad Kabayad on returning migrant workers and members of their families. It seeks to define its best practices in order to replicate them and promote more vigorous and responsive programs among women migrant workers and members of their families. The research pinpoints good practices, gaps, lessons, and emerging issues for gender-responsive for reintegration. Key findings of the research cover five areas, namely; policies and programs on return and reintegration, current gender competence in return and reintegration, partnerships and technical cooperation management in return and reintegration, and accountabilities in gender return and reintegration.
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Violence and especially sexual violence against rural left behind girls is on the rise. Rural left behind girls have been left by their parents in rural areas while they go search for employment in urban areas. These girls do not have proper awareness of sexual violence or how to protect themselves, and with little or no guardianship are severely vulnerable to being taken advantage of. Rural left behind girls and migrant girls are China’s top two targeted groups for trafficking.
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It is important to distinguish between migration, smuggling and trafficking, because of the misperceptions that men migrate and women are trafficked – although men are also trafficked and increasing numbers of women are migrating independently.
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International migration, especially of women migrant workers is driven by, among other factors: the search for decent jobs (Priority 1); access to resources including energy sources and water (Priorities 2 and 5); the urbanization drive that sees men and women and their families migrate internationally from rural areas in countries of origin to cities in countries of destination (Priority 3); food insecurity and unsustainable agricultural systems (Priority 4); and climate change and environmental degradation (linked to priorities 2, and 5-7).
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International Conventions and Human Rights Standards in the Framework:1. CEDAW: The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women2. GR No. 26: the CEDAW Committee’s General Recommendation No. 26 on Women Migrant Workers3. ICRMW: International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families4. GC No. 1: the Committee on Migrant Workers’ General Comment No. 1 on Migrant Domestic Workers
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International Conventions and Regional Human Rights Standards in the Framework: CEDAW: The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women GR No. 26: the CEDAW Committee’s General Recommendation No. 26 on Women Migrant Workers ICRMW: International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families GC No. 1: the Committee on Migrant Workers’ General Comment No. 1 on Migrant Domestic Workers ASEAN Declaration: The ASEAN Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers
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Women represent two thirds of the poor in Asia. Over 50% of all international migrants in Asia are women – the bulk of whom are employed as domestic workers.
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Women’s migration in search of decent work and sustainable livelihoods, to support themselves and their families has become an enduring structural feature of international migration, which is set to be one of the mega-trends of the 21st century. The “feminization” of migration is most visible in Asia, where women – especially young women - constitute over half of all migrant workers. In Nepal, women represent over 68% of migrants, while in Indonesia this figure is even higher – 83%. Domestic work is the dominant profession for migrant women with women representing 83% of domestic workers worldwide.
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The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), adopted on 18 December 1979 and entering into force on 3 September 1981 is an international Convention that is also known as the “International Bill of Rights for Women”. It is one of the core human rights treaties, and with 187 States Parties, CEDAW remains one of the most highly ratified UN Conventions. Governments who commit to CEDAW are legally bound to eliminate discrimination against women, including women migrant workers. The Convention comprehensively defines discrimination against women as including sexual and gender-based violence against women, and other human rights violations. CEDAW enjoys widespread support throughout Asia – for instance all Member States of ASEAN (the Association of Southeast Asian Nations) have ratified CEDAW. Several other Asian countries have also made the commitment to implement CEDAW. All Member States of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation have committed to CEDAW.
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Women are often discriminated against and have difficulty accessing formal employment. Chinese women continue to receive lower pay than men for performing the same job, are more likely to work in the informal sector, and often confined to positions that are aligned with socially constructed gender roles.
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Studies show higher numbers of women in parliament generally contribute to stronger attention to women’s issues. Women’s political participation is a fundamental prerequisite for gender equality. It facilitates women’s direct engagement in public decision-making and is a means of ensuring better accountability to women. One of the pillars of UN Women’s work is advancing women’s political participation and good governance, to ensure that decisionmaking processes are participatory, responsive, equitable and inclusive. Efforts are focused through strategic entry points that can advance the status of women by catalysing wide-ranging, long-term impacts.
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The participatory action research on Return and Reintegration: Women’s participation and Gender-Responsive Interventions aims to address pertinent questions surrounding gender-responsive intervention on return and reintegration. UN Women capacitated the research team of Atikha Inc. to assess its initiatives on reintegration, conduct a case study on migrant returnee and gender analysis, and identified good practice. The research is conducted in 2012 in the Philippines through focus groups discussion, workshops, and key informant interviews including the in-depth interviews of women migrant workers currently working in Italy and returnees. The research recommends various stakeholders to unite on the concept of a gender responsive comprehensive reintegration program and encourages the Philippine government to define its migration policies and recognize strategy role of gender-responsive reintegration program.