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[Infographics] Women who migrate for work contribute greatly to stronger societies and economies in both their countries of origin and their countries of destination. For many, the decision to work abroad involves prioritizing their families’ welfare over their own personal comfort and desires. Women generally have fewer options than men for regular migration, and are often employed in lower paid, informal sectors with few, if any, labour protections.
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These statistics set the tone for a series of conversations jointly hosted by UN Women and the French Embassy in Sri Lanka, in the broader context of COVID-19 and the parallel worsening of gender equality. In the course of the six discussions – each based on the thematic focus areas of the Generation Equality Forum – experts and activists repeatedly highlighted three underlying problems in relation to gender equality and women’s rights in Sri Lanka.
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In 2020, Bangladesh faced a double disaster Cyclone and COVID-19 in Khulna and Satkhira districts amongst the hardest hit. Thousands of families lost their livelihoods and incomes overnight. While the government provided direct assistance to those affected, many women and girls fell through the cracks. At the onset of the pandemic, UN Women expanded the group of NGOs that it worked with and created the Gender Monitoring Network (GMN), a network of 28 civil society organizations (CSOs) and women’s rights organizations. Organizations from the GMN supported UN Women in identifying vulnerable groups of women and girls, including transgender and sex workers, for unconditional cash assistance.
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The infographic was based on a policy research “Leveraging Digitalization to cope with COVID-19: An Indonesia case study on women-owned micro and small businesses” by UN Women in partnership with Pulse Lab Jakarta and Gojek, with the support of National Council for Financial Inclusion of Indonesia (S-DNKI).
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Women and girls are part of the most vulnerable groups in times of humanitarian crisis such as COVID-19. To ensure all the information and available support are accessible to all, we need to ensure women’s representation and voices are visible at the decision-making level.
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Women and girls face even more violence in times of humanitarian crises, such as this moment with COVID- 19 and past outbreaks when movement is restricted. Violence against women has been called a “shadow pandemic” because it has huge consequences on the health and well-being of women and girls, but they often suffer in the shadows which has socio-economic costs that will last beyond the pandemic.
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Having been the first region to face the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, markets and businesses in Asia-Pacific are now showing early signs of revival and leading the way towards a new economic reality. But until more progress is made, the positive developments in closing the gender gap could come under pressure. Despite a growing number of resources made available to develop women’s entrepreneurship, gender inequalities still exist. 
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The Toolkit provides comprehensive guidance on ensuring the protection and promotion of the rights of women migrant workers throughout the labour migration cycle. The Toolkit includes a policy brief series that describes the process of establishing national, bilateral and regional policy protections. The Gender-responsive Guidance on Employment Contracts supports relevant stakeholders to ensure these policies and protections are reflected in employment contracts. The Gender-responsive Self-assessment Tool for Recruitment Agencies provides recruiters with information on how to protect and promote the rights of women migrant workers in practice, throughout the migration cycle....
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Violence against women is one of the most pervasive human rights violations worldwide and has enormous costs for women’s health, safety and well-being. Globally, around 38 per cent of murders of women are committed by an intimate partner. Almost on-third of all women who have been in a relationship world-wider reported that they have experienced some form of violence...
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The Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) seek to change the course of the 21 st century by addressing key challenges such as poverty, inequality, health, and women’s empowerment. Ending violence against women would accelerate achieving the SDGs.
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The women of ASEAN already contribute significantly to the ASEAN economies. Yet many obstacles remain which must be removed to ensure their equal participation in and benefit from ASEAN economic growth and development. This was one of the main findings of the research report on the Projected Gender Impact of the ASEAN Economic Community, undertaken by the ASEAN Secretariat, UN Women and the German political foundation Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES) with the support of the Australian Government...
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From agriculture to traditional crafts, rural women sustain the informal sector in a variety of ways.
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Evaluation findings suggest that UN Women's collaboration with the Positive Women's Network (PWN+) from 2006 to 2011 was instrumental in providing a safespace, counseling, health and income generating services to women living with HIV.
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The call for a transformative framework to achieve women’s rights and gender equality comes in the midst of a global conversation about the legacy and next steps after the MDGs. Intergovernmental and UN-led processes are currently under way to inform and design a post-2015 development agenda and SDGs.
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This publication is meant to serve as a ready reference on the country-specific legal protections that exist for women migrant workers in source and destination countries in the programmeme countries of UN Women’s Asia & Arab States Regional programmeme on Empowering Women Migrant Workers in Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Jordan, Lao PDR, Nepal, Philippines. In addition, destination countries and territories such as Bahrain, Hong Kong SAR, UAE, Singapore and Thailand were included.
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International migration, especially of women migrant workers is driven by, among other factors: the search for decent jobs (Priority 1); access to resources including energy sources and water (Priorities 2 and 5); the urbanization drive that sees men and women and their families migrate internationally from rural areas in countries of origin to cities in countries of destination (Priority 3); food insecurity and unsustainable agricultural systems (Priority 4); and climate change and environmental degradation (linked to priorities 2, and 5-7).
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Women represent two thirds of the poor in Asia. Over 50% of all international migrants in Asia are women – the bulk of whom are employed as domestic workers.
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The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), adopted on 18 December 1979 and entering into force on 3 September 1981 is an international Convention that is also known as the “International Bill of Rights for Women”. It is one of the core human rights treaties, and with 187 States Parties, CEDAW remains one of the most highly ratified UN Conventions. Governments who commit to CEDAW are legally bound to eliminate discrimination against women, including women migrant workers. The Convention comprehensively defines discrimination against women as including sexual and gender-based violence against women, and other human rights violations. CEDAW enjoys widespread support throughout Asia – for instance all Member States of ASEAN (the Association of Southeast Asian Nations) have ratified CEDAW. Several other Asian countries have also made the commitment to implement CEDAW. All Member States of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation have committed to CEDAW.
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In a village meeting in August 2010 in Maharashtra, India, a woman farmer in the presence of thirty women and twenty-one men said: “When the land is in my husband’s name, I am only a worker.
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Rural, indigenous people live in two simultaneous situations. While they have highly developed capabilities for management of biodiverse natural resources, they are lodged in a discriminated, excluded existence, away from the centre stage of economic and technological change.