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The Gender Marker Toolkit, under the National Resilience Program (NRP), has been designed to strengthen and develop the gender work of the Local Government Engineering Department (LGED) which already has a Gender Equity Strategy and Action Plan and an active Gender Forum. The Toolkit aims to raise awareness, understanding, and skills in ensuring gender responsiveness throughout all project stages and for all asset types that the Bangladesh Local Government Engineering Department (LGED) works on. It also aims to strengthen LGED’s influencer role with other Ministries and Departments.
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The impact of COVID-19 on the Rohingya and host communities has exacerbated existing discrimination and inequalities. Women and girls face an increase in unpaid care work, greater protection risks in and out of their homes and more mental health issues, while simultaneously being less able to access lifesaving services and support.
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This report presents novel research findings – possibly the first such robust findings to date – on the relationship between support for misogyny, violence against women, and extremist violence in Bangladesh, Indonesia and the Philippines.
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This report presents research findings on gender and violent extremism in the Philippines, Bangladesh, and Indonesia. The aim of the research is to examine women’s roles in supporting, countering, and preventing violent extremism and how gender identities and relations may be used to garner support for intolerant social attitudes and groups as well as recruitment to violent extremist groups.
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Violent extremism has emerged as one of the leading challenges to the realization of sustainable peace globally. Across South and South-East Asia, violent extremism poses a direct threat to inclusive development by fuelling intolerance, forcibly displacing communities, exacerbating cycles of insecurity and armed conflict, exploiting existing inequalities, and obstructing the enjoyment of human rights and the rule of law. Underpinning this violence are gender stereotypes that are used to radicalize and recruit men and women, as well as girls and boys, to violent extremist groups.
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Intimate partner violence (IPV), like all kinds of violence, is a violation of human rights. Violence committed by an intimate partner – whether a current or former spouse, boyfriend, girlfriend or dating partner – has devastating physical, emotional, financial and social effects on women, children, families and communities around the world. IPV can happen to anyone. It occurs across all societies, countries, cultures and genders, but women are by far the most at risk. In the worst cases, it can culminate in femicide, or the targeted gender-related murder of women.
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[A gender analysis of terrorism and violent extremism in the online space in Bangladesh, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines] Numerous research shows the online space is being used by terrorist and violent extremist groups to target men and women for recruitment. However, what is not yet understood is if and how men and women are actively seeking out this material online. This report seeks to build knowledge on this question in relation to South and South East Asia. It presents new data...
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This study in Bangladesh and Indonesia has identified the many ways in which women and men influence values, attitudes and behaviours within their communities, from raising awareness of violent extremism, challenging belief systems that cause harm to women and children, to advocating education for women and girls. Four key outcomes can be discerned from the research con-ducted across programme and non-programme sites in Bangla-desh and Indonesia...
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This brief summarizes innovative research conducted by Monash University’s Gender, Peace and Security Centre in conjunction with UN Women’s “Empowered Women, Peaceful Communities” programme. The research examined how the programme has impacted social cohesion, women’s empowerment, community empowerment, and preventing and countering extremist ideologies in the programme communities in Indonesia and Bangladesh. To do this, an in-depth qualitative and quantitative...
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An overview of progress in Asia with evidence from Bangladesh, Cambodia and Viet Nam. Documented evidence from around the world demonstratesthat climate change and disaster impacts are not genderneutral. This also applies to Asia where available evidenceshows there are differences in how men and women areaffected by, cope with, and respond to the effects of climatechange and disasters....
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As part of the flagship project, Reducing Vulnerability of Women Affected by Climate Change through Viable Livelihood Options, UN Women Bangladesh has been exploring the impacts of migration on women caused by climate change-related phenomena. Together with research partners, the Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies, UN Women studied 10 districts in three different eco-zones in Bangladesh to understand the district-specific implications that women face due to male migratory trends.