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UN Women and UNDP have piloted a training programme on Non-Violent Communication – a method which has found success in international mediation and conflict resolution settings – in Bangladesh, the Maldives and Sri Lanka. The project was generously supported by the Government of Australia and the European Union. This brief provides an overview of the approaches used in the pilot project and presents results from the evaluations of the trainings.
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This report identifies both the persistent trends and changing gender dynamics of violent extremism in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, based on an expert survey and interview research conducted between July and November 2021. It examined how and to what extent misogyny and hostile beliefs are fuelling violent extremism in the Southeast Asian region during the pandemic, the degree to which misogyny and hostile beliefs in the ASEAN region are fuelling violent extremism, and how these manifest themselves in the offline space.
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The Peace Village Initiative, implemented by the Wahid Foundation since 2017 with the support of UN Women and other donors, is an ambitious initiative that aims to address the drivers of extremism among women by mobilizing community members, especially women, to promote social cohesion across Java Island in Indonesia.
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The study report of National Women Commission, Nepal, monitors the progress on the implementation of the 2018, Concluding Observations issued by the CEDAW Committee on the sixth periodic report of Nepal. The progress was systematically monitored on the basis of a novel and practical tool.
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The study report of the National Women’s Commission of Nepal provides the implementation status of the 2018, Concluding Observations of the CEDAW Committee on the sixth periodic report of Nepal. The report serves as tool for enabling the State to fulfil its human rights obligation, particularly in light of the seventh periodic report that has to be submitted to the CEDAW Committee in November 2022.
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In order to become a Peace Village, members within a community commit to promoting and fostering tolerance and peace within their communities. Starting with making peace within the family, members then agree on guidelines to enhance social cohesion in the community.
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This training package on Gender and Preventing Violent Extremism is designed to increase the understanding of the critical role gender can play in understanding, addressing and preventing violent extremism (PVE). It is intended to support women’s organisations and civil society in their ongoing work on PVE, and related fields of women, peace and security. The training package is designed for use in Indonesia and Bangladesh, as well as South and Southeast Asia.
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The 2019 Annual Report of the United Nations in China highlights results and impacts in the following priority areas; poverty reduction and equitable development, improved and sustainable environment, enhanced global engagement with an emphasis on cross-cutting areas such as gender equality, and leaving no one behind.
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This brief explores recent research, which examines the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of women and men students of two universities in northern Bangladesh. It found that young women and men in northern Bangladesh identify gender equality and equal opportunities for women and men as the single most critical element for social cohesion in Bangladesh.
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The linkages between organized crime, including trafficking in persons, and violent extremism are a global concern. These linkages are starting to receive some attention, but this is limited to specific conflict contexts such as Iraq and Syria. In recognition of the link between violent extremism and trafficking in persons and the gendered nature of both, the UN Security Council adopted its first resolution on trafficking in persons in areas affected by armed conflict in 2016 (UNSCR 2331). But overall, there is little understanding of the relationship between violent extremism and trafficking in persons, or of how gender informs this interaction.
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This report presents novel research findings – possibly the first such robust findings to date – on the relationship between support for misogyny, violence against women, and extremist violence in Bangladesh, Indonesia and the Philippines.
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This report presents research findings on gender and violent extremism in the Philippines, Bangladesh, and Indonesia. The aim of the research is to examine women’s roles in supporting, countering, and preventing violent extremism and how gender identities and relations may be used to garner support for intolerant social attitudes and groups as well as recruitment to violent extremist groups.
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This CEDAW-based legal review of the Magna Carta of migrant workers and the anti-trafficking laws in the Philippines is indispensable to give concrete recommendations on improving laws that protect women migrant workers. It aims to identify gender discrimination in laws and underscore state obligations to address existing gender discrimination in laws.
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This review comprised chiefly of desk research. To determine whether the Philippines has complied with its state obligations, the study used the UN-identified CEDAW indicators contained in the handbook entitled Do Our Laws Promote Gender Equality?
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This Guide discusses how migration is mainstreamed into the Philippines development framework, particularly from a gender perspective. This requires mainstreaming M&D issues in every phase of the development planning cycle.
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This paper highlights the unique discriminations and exclusions lesbians, bisexual women, transgender and intersex persons (LBTI) face across the region as well as the challenging issue that gender and sexual diversity remains based on the proceedings of the 2016 Regional Consultation on Promoting and Protecting the Rights of Lesbians, Bisexual women, Transgender and Despite changes in national legislations and policies, such as the abolition of a ban on same-sex marriages...
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With the growing recognition that laws and justice systems are not adequately working for women, Justice Base led a research report to examine women access to justice in the formal and informal processes, decision-makers and institutions that play a role in resolving dispute involving women in Myanmar. Traditional dispute mechanisms are often preferred by women because of the high cost of the state legal system, corruption, gender bias, and language barriers for ethnic minorities who are non-Myanmar language speakers.
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With the purpose to eliminate gender stereotypes in justice delivery as a critical component of promoting women’s access to justice, this paper seeks to develop critical understanding among judges and other justice actors on gender stereotypes, and how it could be avoid, as well as to provide judicial training programmes for justice actors in investigation and adjudication.
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This paper endeavors to analyze Case Laws regarding core Articles of the Convention on Elimination of All Form of Discrimination and their application in Southeast Asia national courts. It is an analytical compilation of jurisprudence from Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Timor-Leste that is intended to serve as a resource to enhance their capacity to utilize international human rights standards for the realization of women’s human rights embodied in the Convention.
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This paper endeavors to compile good practices, challenges and to strengthen the capacity of National Women’s Machineries for monitoring implementation of CEDAW and BPFA.