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The toolkit provides a grounding in risk control and business continuity, with particular reference to the COVID-19 pandemic response. With its step-by-step guidance, checklist, and various tools, the toolkit becomes a self-learning tool for SME leaders across the world, so that they can better address risks and build their own gender- responsive business continuity management system.
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Skills development is key to economic empowerment of women migrant workers and improvements of their lives in Thailand and after returning to their countries of origin. Especially during the COVID-19 pandemic, skills development become more necessary and should be given to women migrant workers to overcome inequalities in economic and social development which are increasingly exacerbated. Skills development can improve productivity and help women migrant workers diversify their employment opportunities enhancing their possibilities to secure employment during the crisis and as part of recovery.
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The finance maps work much like a dating site for women entrepreneurs and finance providers. First, you open the finance map for your country. Second, simply fill out your profile, filter on what you are looking for and the map will list the finance providers that best match your business.
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The WE Rise Toolkit for Accelerators consists of three tools that provide actionable steps to unlock the power of gender inclusivity for your organisation and acceleration programme. This will enable entrepreneurs from all genders to benefit equally from the support you have to offer. To implement a more inclusive and innovative acceleration programme that yields business benefits for entrepreneurs and ecosystem partners, it’s advised to applying all of the three tools.
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The WE Rise Toolkit for Entrepreneurs consists of four tools that provide actionable steps to unlock the power of gender inclusivity for your business. The WE Rise Toolkit is unique in the fact that it shows how gender equality means good business. You can use our four tools in an iterative manner. Once you’ve completed all four tools you can start over as to further sharpen your gender inclusive business.
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This report, developed by UN Women’s WeEmpowerAsia programme and the International Labour Organization’s (ILO) Responsible Supply Chains in Asia programme, provides policymakers, companies, civil society, employer organisations and other stakeholders in the ASEAN region with comprehensive details on reporting and implementing the Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs)-related policies.
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Women in the Philippine C-Suite: National Study - The study includes best practice examples, policies as well as recommendations on how to further promote gender equality, diversity and inclusion adapting the Women’s Empowerment Principles Framework as guidance for actions moving forward.
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In 2010, UN Women and UN Global Compact Network developed the Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs). Forged through an international multi-stakeholder consultative process, the WEPs provide a “gender lens” through which business can analyse current initiatives, benchmarks and reporting practices. Informed by real-life business practices, the Principles help companies tailor existing policies and practices – or establish needed new ones – to realize women’s empowerment in the workplace, marketplace and communities.
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Since 2014, UN Women has played a significant role in convening diverse stakeholders to respond to and localize the emerging and new global paradigms on women’s unpaid work, with a special focus on Goal 5 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). A loose alliance called the Collective on Women’s Unpaid Work was formed to support the development of a common roadmap for policy and action, which included the recognition, reduction and redistribution of women’s unpaid work...
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[POLICY BRIEF - 3] Implementing Gender-Responsive Employment Contracts analyses current methods used to monitor the implementation of contracts and makes recommendations to strengthen accountability against the terms of employment contracts...
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[POLICY BRIEF - 2] Promoting the Rights of Women Migrant Workers through Employment Contracts identifies and compares existing contract provisions in the South Asia - Middle East corridor and summarizes strengths and gaps in protection in line with common right violations reported by women migrant workers themselves. It makes recommendations on addressing these gaps by creating enforceable rights-based, gender-responsive employment contracts...
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[POLICY BRIEF - 1] Implementing Gender-Responsive Employment Contracts analyses current methods used to monitor the implementation of contracts and makes recommendations to strengthen accountability against the terms of employment contracts...
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This three-part Policy Brief series identifies actions to develop and implement effective, rights-based and gender responsive protections for women workers migrating from South Asia to the Middle East. The policy briefs address three key stages during which protections for women migrant workers are developed, implemented, and monitored. Making International Labour Migration Governance Gender Responsive outlines the role of labour migration governance and policies in determining the living and...
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This self-assessment tool was developed to ensure employers, governments and recruitment agencies have policies, codes of conduct, systems and training in place that effectively meet the needs of women migrant workers. The tool was developed by UN Women, in partnership with the International Organization for Migration (IOM), building on research into the experiences and perspectives of migrant women, and on international human rights standards and commitments. The tool provides a practical...
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Domestic workers are often partially or fully excluded from national labour laws and related protections. The lack of comprehensive legal protection for domestic workers means employment contracts play a critical role in establishing protections of their rights. Without definitive legal principles to govern the employment relationship with their employers, domestic workers report working long hours without overtime payment, sufficient weekly rest or holidays. They may experience non-payment ...
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The Toolkit provides comprehensive guidance on ensuring the protection and promotion of the rights of women migrant workers throughout the labour migration cycle. The Toolkit includes a policy brief series that describes the process of establishing national, bilateral and regional policy protections. The Gender-responsive Guidance on Employment Contracts supports relevant stakeholders to ensure these policies and protections are reflected in employment contracts. The Gender-responsive Self-assessment Tool for Recruitment Agencies provides recruiters with information on how to protect and promote the rights of women migrant workers in practice, throughout the migration cycle....
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There are approximately 300,000 Laotian migrants working in Thailand which accounts for over half of all migrants from Laos PDR globally. Their remittances are responsible for between 25 and 50 percent of the income of rural household in the country. To reduce vulnerability to labour exploitation and human trafficking, information particularly pre-departure should be made available and accessible. Appropriate knowledge and accessibility will empower migrants to make informed choices and...
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This study includes a policy mapping of restrictions on women’s migration in ASEAN, and looks in detail at two particular policy restrictions: the 2014 Myanmar ban on migration to any country for domestic work, and the 2011 Cambodia ban on migration to Malaysia for domestic work. These policy restrictions were chosen because these countries are in the scope of the ILO TRIANGLE in ASEAN programme and the UN Women project ‘Preventing the Exploitation of Women Migrant Workers in...
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Establishing a Standard Terms of Employment (STOE) for women migrant domestic workers is crucial as they are excluded from national labour laws of most countries, both countries of origin and destination. They are doubly vulnerable through their status as migrants and as woman. Furthermore, domestic work takes place in informal, private settings and thus it is very important to formalize domestic work to protect the rights of migrant domestic workers. Countries of origin and destination agree...