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This guidance for Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) is an essential tool to make sure a coordinated response to VAW, including women migrant workers, is put in place. Because of the multi-faceted nature of VAW and the specific challenges and needs of women migrant workers, coordinated approaches to addressing it are considered more effective than when different actors work in isolation to address the issue.
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Skills development is key to economic empowerment of women migrant workers and improvements of their lives in Thailand and after returning to their countries of origin. Especially during the COVID-19 pandemic, skills development become more necessary and should be given to women migrant workers to overcome inequalities in economic and social development which are increasingly exacerbated. Skills development can improve productivity and help women migrant workers diversify their employment opportunities enhancing their possibilities to secure employment during the crisis and as part of recovery.
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This note provides guidance on the safe use of remote technologies to provide support to women migrant workers who are at risk of, or have experienced violence, harassment, abuse or exploitation. The provision of services through remote technologies is not new. However, various remote methods are increasingly being used as technological innovations evolve and they become more accessible.
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Now, nearly a decade later, the TRIANGLE in ASEAN programme (ILO) and Safe and Fair programme (ILO and UN Women) have conducted a similar survey of 4,099 nationals to track trends of attitudes in three of the above countries. One of the original four countries was changed, with the Republic of Korea replaced by Japan, given its emergence as an important destination country for low-skilled migrant workers in Asia. Certain questions from the first survey were repeated to allow for identification...
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Since 2014, UN Women has played a significant role in convening diverse stakeholders to respond to and localize the emerging and new global paradigms on women’s unpaid work, with a special focus on Goal 5 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). A loose alliance called the Collective on Women’s Unpaid Work was formed to support the development of a common roadmap for policy and action, which included the recognition, reduction and redistribution of women’s unpaid work...
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India is one of the largest countries of origin, transit and destination for international migrants. A majority of Indian migrants in the Emigration Check Required category go to the Gulf Cooperation Council countries. Over the years, there has been an increasing trend of feminization of migration in the country, with women now accounting for 49 per cent of all migrants from India. Within this framework, domestic work is the largest sector driving international female labour migration. Migrant...
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This study includes a policy mapping of restrictions on women’s migration in ASEAN, and looks in detail at two particular policy restrictions: the 2014 Myanmar ban on migration to any country for domestic work, and the 2011 Cambodia ban on migration to Malaysia for domestic work. These policy restrictions were chosen because these countries are in the scope of the ILO TRIANGLE in ASEAN programme and the UN Women project ‘Preventing the Exploitation of Women Migrant Workers in...
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Domestic workers, the vast majority of whom are women and girls, make a critical contribution to societies and economies across the world. Still, domestic work is typically not regarded as work and is often excluded from full protection under labour legislation and social security provisions. It is usually carried out for private households, often without clear terms of employment, leaving...
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As part of the flagship project, Reducing Vulnerability of Women Affected by Climate Change through Viable Livelihood Options, UN Women Bangladesh has been exploring the impacts of migration on women caused by climate change-related phenomena. Together with research partners, the Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies, UN Women studied 10 districts in three different eco-zones in Bangladesh to understand the district-specific implications that women face due to male migratory trends.