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The COVID-19 pandemic has increased the extent to which women peace builders use ICT and digital solutions to support their work. Although gender biases in these technologies hinder equal and safe online engagement, digital peace building and online civic engagement are venues for increased opportunities for women peace builders to advance their work. Digital solutions will play important roles in several key peace building areas. This brief outlines some of the challenges and opportunities that AI carries for the implementation of the Women, Peace and Security agenda in Southeast Asia.
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UN Women and UNDP have piloted a training programme on Non-Violent Communication – a method which has found success in international mediation and conflict resolution settings – in Bangladesh, the Maldives and Sri Lanka. The project was generously supported by the Government of Australia and the European Union. This brief provides an overview of the approaches used in the pilot project and presents results from the evaluations of the trainings.
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The regional project Empowering Women for Sustainable Peace: Preventing Violence and Promoting Social Cohesion in ASEAN aims to achieve the ultimate goal that ASEAN Member States will advance and strengthen the implementation of the WPS agenda, including preventing violence against women and girls and promoting social cohesion in the region.
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The regional project Empowering Women for Sustainable Peace seeks to operationalize a simple but revolutionary idea first introduced in the landmark United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000) – that peace is inextricably linked to equality between men and women.
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The Women living under the pandemic and military rule survey looks at the way that women are affected by macro developments and trends. It is important to understand the real-time social and economic impacts of COVID-19 and the military rule, not just for measures of income poverty but also for vulnerability more generally and for how the double crisis is impacting Myanmar’s women both at the family and individual levels.
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The fall of Afghanistan’s government to Taliban rule has further limited the ability of women and girls to exercise their rights, forcing many to flee their homes, seeking safety either elsewhere within the country or in neighbouring countries. This factsheet examines the needs, fears, and barriers encountered by Afghan women and girls who are internally displaced or who have fled abroad. It is the first in a series that will examine the changing situation in Afghanistan as additional data become available. It was produced by the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).
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This research analyses Pakistan’s security protocols through a dual lens of gender and peacebuilding and aims to fill the knowledge gap to support the integration of gendered perspectives into the security policies of Pakistan. It triangulates the global Women Peace and Security (WPS) Agenda with the Preventing Violent Extremism (PVE) practice to undertake a comparative analysis of National Action Plans of three regional countries: Jordan, Indonesia, and Bangladesh.
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The research study analyses the gendered aspects of the ethnic and religious conflict in Pakistan that can potentially lead to a breakdown of social cohesion and stability. There was a focus on how women are affected by and implicated in situations of conflict and violence.
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This report analyses the gendered aspects of the ethnic and religious conflict in Pakistan that can potentially lead to a breakdown of social cohesion and stability. In order to effectively understand the drivers of conflict and the factors that threaten community security and social cohesion focusing on women and young women, UN Women commissioned a research study titled: “Resilience, Community Security and Social Cohesion through Effective Women’s Leadership”.
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Human trafficking is an issue that transcends national borders. Women and girls are disproportionately affected by this crime. Although research shows that increasing the number of women in law enforcement results in law enforcement that is more responsive to women’s needs and more operationally effective, women represent a small share of law enforcement officers in the ASEAN Region ranging from 6% in Indonesia to 20% in Lao PDR. In 2017, UN Women and UNODC set out to jointly mitigate these challenges, leading up to a four-year partnership between the agencies.
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The “UN Women impact stories series”, updated quarterly, illustrates the human impact of UN Women’s work across Asia and the Pacific, highlighting the partnerships that make this work possible. These stories share how we and our many partners are striding forward to realize a better world for women and girls—one of equality and empowerment because that is what we do and who we are, as a leader, mobilizer, convenor, and provider of programmes.
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Globally, women have long been at the frontlines of conflict and crisis, often leading and participatingin negotiations with parties in conflict to arrive at truce and ceasefire modalities. Yet often, women’sexpertise and priorities are excluded from formal ceasefire agreements and monitoring mechanisms.This exclusion is informed by the assumption that discussion on ceasefire requires technical knowledgeon military skills.
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In Asia and the Pacific, women experience significant barriers to participating in public and political life. Due to economic, social and cultural factors, women’s political representation in the region remains comparatively low, and the COVID-19 pandemic is aggravating pre-existing obstacles for women’s public engagement. A direct threat to women’s political participation is online hate speech and misogyny.
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More than 140 civil society representatives and gender equality advocates from 43 countries across the world participated in the consultation, including from Asia and the Pacific. The views and recommendations from participants were summarized and gathered into a public statement developed by civil society members.
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From the global Digital consultation on “Voices and perspectives of civil society on the gendered dimensions of violent extremism and counterterrorism responses” UN Women commissioned a set of regional papers to identify specific views and recommendations, in addition to those captured in the Public Statement. The present paper focuses on Asia and the Pacific and the contributions of participants from countries in the region.
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UN Women Pakistan, with Aurat Foundation as research partner, and in collaboration with key government and civil society partners, conducted a Women’s Safety Audit (WSA) in 5 cities across Pakistan, including Karachi, Dadu, Khairpur, Quetta and Rawalpindi, in order to better understand the status of women’s access to safe public spaces. Rigorous data analysis based on robust tools and methodology, collection of empirical evidence and comprehensive statistical examination was done to deduce findings of this important report in order to ensure the results are reached in a scientific manner and the recommendations are both pragmatic and effective.
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Along with the Timor-Leste government’s effort in advancing the agenda of NAP 1325 in UNSCR on Women, Peace and Security, there has been an escalation on the number of women’s participation in the decision making and peace building role started from the community, up to the institutional level.
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In contemporary peacebuilding missions, such as that in Afghanistan, local ownership has been framed as the extent to which domestic actors control the design and implementation of the processes. What happens when local actors are not involved in its design? What happens when they begin to oppose it? And how much of the achievements under liberal frameworks and institutions are self-sustainable when international peacebuilders leave?
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[Commemorating 20 years of UN Security Council Resolution 1325] - On 25 August 2017, the military offensive in Rakhine state, Myanmar, targeting the Rohingya escalated and the violence unleashed upon them forced them to flee across the border to Bangladesh. To date 861,545 Rohingya refugees live in camps in Cox’s Bazar, over half of which are women and girls and an estimated 80% of whom are women and children.
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Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, violence against women and girls has intensified globally. Analysis of social media suggests that the same is true for online misogyny and hate speech directed at women in South and South-East Asia. As COVID-19 lockdowns and other movement restrictions push more people online, digital platforms and online spaces are being increasingly used to spread sexist, inaccurate, and dangerous rhetoric about women, inciting hatred and potentially provoking violence – online and offline. This brief examines the links between the COVID-19 pandemic and online misogyny and hate speech directed at women in South and South-East Asia for the period of March – June 2020. It is based on the findings of research conducted by Mythos Labs for UN Women Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.