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Entrepreneurship is a catalyst for women’s economic empowerment. In China, as in the rest of the world, despite a recent surge in women’s entrepreneurship, women-owned businesses tend to be small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). SMEs are more vulnerable in emergencies than larger companies are, and many women-owned SMEs are situated in the service sector, which was hit the hardest by the pandemic.
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Despite recent progress in advancing economic justice, the world economy still suffers from a gender gap, and China is no exception. The private sector is an important catalyst for sustainable and gender-inclusive development and economic growth.
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The World Economic Forum says that at the current rate of change, it will take 108 years to close the overall gender gap and 202 years to bring parity in the workplace. India has one of the lowest female labour force participation rates in the world and a majority of women work in the informal sector.
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Women and girls have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic’s social isolation and economic fallout. They face increased violence, unpaid care work, and other inequalities and violations of their rights.
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Building on the seven Women's Empowerment Principles (WEPs), this tool will enable companies to assess their COVID-19 response and ensure they are supporting women during and beyond the crisis while safeguarding existing progress on women’s economic empowerment with both short-term and long-term actions.
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India is one of the largest countries of origin, transit and destination for international migrants. A majority of Indian migrants in the Emigration Check Required category go to the Gulf Cooperation Council countries. Over the years, there has been an increasing trend of feminization of migration in the country, with women now accounting for 49 per cent of all migrants from India. Within this framework, domestic work is the largest sector driving international female labour migration. Migrant...
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Part of UN Women’s Stories of Change series, this publication tells the story of Atefe Mansoori, an entrepreneur in Afghanistan who has defied her family and conservative factions to start her own saffron export business and provides training and employment opportunities to other women in Afghanistan.
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Part of UN Women’s Stories of Change series, Ryahem Alem tells her story of going through UN Women’s intern programme. The 22-year-old from Badakhshan is a trainee midwife who was placed at Ali Seena Hospital in Kabul.
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Part of UN Women’s Stories of Change series, this publication tells the story of Zarmeena, a survivor of violence who sought help at a UN Women-funded Women’s Protection Centre. The support services, legal support and vocational training has helped her return to school and escape violence.
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Part of UN Women’s Stories of Change series, this publication tells the story of Nabila Azizi, a university graduate who went through UN Women’s intern programme and was placed with the World Food Programme.