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This is the second report issued that synthesizes the priorities and recommendations of Afghan women from consultations undertaken by UN Women, UNAMA and IOM. The aim of the consultations is to bring in the voices of a diverse cross-section of Afghan women on policy and programming challenges facing Afghanistan, to ensure that their perspectives inform decision-making.
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Since August 2021, the Taliban have implemented a consistent and continuously expanding assault on women’s rights in Afghanistan. An assault which, with each passing day, decree after decree, sees the Taliban move closer to approximating their period of rule in Afghanistan during the 1990s. This Gender Alert brings together publicly available gender data and analysis covering the period between August 2022 and February 2023.
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The purpose of this brief is to present the key priorities of Afghan women across the country and their recommendations on what the international community and national stakeholders can do to change the current situation.
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This Gender Alert concludes that the 24 December 2022 ban: (1) is discriminatory and dictates who humanitarian actors can(not) employ, and who they can reach with assistance; (2) has multilayered implications that go beyond the inability of reaching women and girls with life-saving assistance, including dealing a further blow to the Afghan economy amid the ongoing crisis; and (3) speeds up the erasure of Afghan women and girls from all aspects of Afghan public and private life.
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Findings and recommendations from the RNA are intended to serve as a source of information for actors supporting women’s livelihoods in Afghanistan, including UN agencies and other international organizations.
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This Gender Alert maps gender trends and recommendations in connection to the evictions of internally displaced persons and the destruction of informal settlements in Badghis. It has been developed by the Gender in Humanitarian Action (GiHA) Working Group and the Women Advisory Group (WAG) to the Humanitarian Country Team (HCT) in Afghanistan
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The complex and protracted humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan affects persons of all genders, at-risk and marginalized groups differently. Women and girls are disproportionately affected because of gender-specific restrictions that directly impact their ability to realize their rights. Traditional gender norms and patriarchal cultures have long reinforced discrimination against women and girls in Afghanistan, increasing their vulnerability and decreasing their capacity to recover from shocks, leaving them disproportionately affected during crises.
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The second thematic brief looks at the legal and justice system changes and implications for gender equality and women’s rights in Afghanistan since the Taliban take-over on 15 August 2021. While incremental progress was made prior to August 2021 to advance access to justice for women and girls in Afghanistan, there has been an observable and swift backslide. Institutions and infrastructure supporting the legal rights of women, such as legal aid and shelters, have been largely dismantled.
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The brief concluded that the indirect ramifications of dismissing women staff in the media sector removes them from public space, contributing to the retreat of women into domestic environments. The justification underpinning this retreat is often that of protecting women, which normalizes the narrative that women are inherently vulnerable and require protection, erasing their agency and vital contribution to a pluralistic society.
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Pathways for women’s meaningful participation, across all levels of decision-making in politics, the media, the security sector and conflict prevention and resolution mechanisms which, despite challenges, had previously been possible, are currently non-existent. In the lead-up of the Global Open Debate, UN Women Afghanistan run a serios of in-country consultations with Afghan women leaders from diverse sectors in October 2022. The infor­mation presented in this briefs captures the views and policy recommendation of Afghan women on the relevance of the WPS agenda to Afghanistan.
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A study looking at Promoting the Recruitment and Retention of Women Humani­tarian Workers in Afghanistan. The study aims to identify specific barriers faced by Afghan women in their work for humanitarian aid agencies. It also aims to share best practices and recommendations for reversing these barriers, and for enabling more women to participate in humanitarian action. This will be vital for ensuring access by women, chil­dren, and marginalized groups to life-saving assistance.
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A week ago, a 5.9 magnitude earthquake struck the Central Region of Afghanistan impacting Paktika and Khost provinces. Humanitarian assistance is being delivered in the most affected districts.
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On 22 June, at 01:30am, an earthquake of magnitude 5.9 has struck the southeastern provinces of Paktika and Khost (Central Region of Afghanistan), killing at least 770 people and injuring another 1,500. 1,500 homes have reportedly been destroyed and damaged in Gayan2 (Paktika Province). According to OCHA and humanitarian teams delivering the response in the two provinces, immediate needs identified on the ground on 22 June include emergency trauma care, emergency shelter and non-food items, food assistance and WASH.
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This study looks at the challenges, barriers, and opportunities of women-led and women-focused CSOs across Afghanistan working in different sectors, with the aim to inform how part­ners can strengthen their power and agency and support them to respond to the needs of the most marginalized and vulnerable communities as well as their participation and leadership within the humanitarian response in Afghanistan. This study has been made possible with the generosity of the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) of the British Government.
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The fall of Afghanistan’s government to Taliban rule has further limited the ability of women and girls to exercise their rights, forcing many to flee their homes, seeking safety either elsewhere within the country or in neighbouring countries. This factsheet examines the needs, fears, and barriers encountered by Afghan women and girls who are internally displaced or who have fled abroad. It is the first in a series that will examine the changing situation in Afghanistan as additional data become available. It was produced by the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).
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This Guidance Note on Gender-responsive conflict analysis initially developed in Afghanistan has global applicability. It provides recommendations on how to apply a gender lens in political and conflict analysis in a way that allows the integration of gender as a variable of power across a social, political, economic analysis of conflict as opposed to addressing issues specific to women and girls in siloed analysis. This approach reveals the critical links between gender dynamics of conflict and peacebuilding.
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The purpose of this Gender Alert is to document and analyze the impact of the rapidly evolving Afghan context on women’s rights and gender equality. This Alert focuses on developments since the Taliban take-over of Kabul on 15 August 2021, shedding light on the impact of the current contextual dynamics on the rights of women and girls.
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The current conflict and political uncertainty in Afghanistan has clear gendered impacts. Restrictive gender norms and harmful practices are being exacerbated. Women and girls are at risk of further marginalization and being left behind. It is critical that women’s voices continue to be consulted, amplified and inform humanitarian decision-making through their participation in humanitarian assessments. Given the current circumstances.
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Globally, women have long been at the frontlines of conflict and crisis, often leading and participatingin negotiations with parties in conflict to arrive at truce and ceasefire modalities. Yet often, women’sexpertise and priorities are excluded from formal ceasefire agreements and monitoring mechanisms.This exclusion is informed by the assumption that discussion on ceasefire requires technical knowledgeon military skills.
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A time-use survey has not previously been conducted in Afghanistan. As a result, there are data gaps on the contribution to human well-being by Afghan women through their unpaid cooking, cleaning and caring for family as well as their contribution to family businesses. Their work is statistically unrecognized despite the large amounts of women’s time that it consumes, and the restrictions it places on women’s ability to engage in other activities.