94
results found
Date:
A week ago, a 5.9 magnitude earthquake struck the Central Region of Afghanistan impacting Paktika and Khost provinces. Humanitarian assistance is being delivered in the most affected districts.
Date:
his study looks at the challenges, barriers, and opportunities of women-led and women-focused CSOs across Afghanistan working in different sectors, with the aim to inform how part­ners can strengthen their power and agency and support them to respond to the needs of the most marginalized and vulnerable communities as well as their participation and leadership within the humanitarian response in Afghanistan. This study has been made possible with the generosity of the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) of the British Government.
Date:
This facilitator’s handbook is designed for women peace activists and women leaders. Its purpose is to empower women leaders and women peace activists by giving them the necessary tools that will not only promote and increase their effective participation in the peace processes but equip them with the information and techniques to train other women peace activists.
Date:
The Women living under the pandemic and military rule survey looks at the way that women are affected by macro developments and trends. It is important to understand the real-time social and economic impacts of COVID-19 and the military rule, not just for measures of income poverty but also for vulnerability more generally and for how the double crisis is impacting Myanmar’s women both at the family and individual levels.
Date:
The fall of Afghanistan’s government to Taliban rule has further limited the ability of women and girls to exercise their rights, forcing many to flee their homes, seeking safety either elsewhere within the country or in neighbouring countries. This factsheet examines the needs, fears, and barriers encountered by Afghan women and girls who are internally displaced or who have fled abroad. It is the first in a series that will examine the changing situation in Afghanistan as additional data become available. It was produced by the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).
Date:
This Guidance Note on Gender-responsive conflict analysis initially developed in Afghanistan has global applicability. It provides recommendations on how to apply a gender lens in political and conflict analysis in a way that allows the integration of gender as a variable of power across a social, political, economic analysis of conflict as opposed to addressing issues specific to women and girls in siloed analysis. This approach reveals the critical links between gender dynamics of conflict and peacebuilding.
Date:
The purpose of this Gender Alert is to document and analyze the impact of the rapidly evolving Afghan context on women’s rights and gender equality. This Alert focuses on developments since the Taliban take-over of Kabul on 15 August 2021, shedding light on the impact of the current contextual dynamics on the rights of women and girls.
Date:
The current conflict and political uncertainty in Afghanistan has clear gendered impacts. Restrictive gender norms and harmful practices are being exacerbated. Women and girls are at risk of further marginalization and being left behind. It is critical that women’s voices continue to be consulted, amplified and inform humanitarian decision-making through their participation in humanitarian assessments. Given the current circumstances.
Date:
This Gender and COVID-19 training module introduce the impact of COVID-19 on women/gender from a Development aspect including Health, Economic, Women Peace and Security (WPS) and Social Cohesion perspective. With a number of gender related health issues exists in Myanmar, COVID-19 pandemic exacerbates negative impact on women and girls in different sectors including health and economic sector. In health sector, there are impacts on not only those who are seeking health services.
Date:
The 2021 version of the Gender in Humanitarian Action (GiHA) profile includes an analysis of the gender-related impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and the February military coup in Rakhine, Kachin, Northern Shan and Kayin States in Myanmar. In 2020 and 2021, the COVID-19 pandemic further complicated the lives of people in humanitarian settings across the country, resulting in significant economic and health impacts.
Date:
This publication was originally conceived by UN Women under the UN Women Centering Women and their priorities in Myanmar’s Peace Process: Implementing the United Nations Security Council Resolution and Related Resolutions 1325, and has been made possible through funding from the Norwegian Ministry for Foreign Affairs.
Date:
Globally, women have long been at the frontlines of conflict and crisis, often leading and participatingin negotiations with parties in conflict to arrive at truce and ceasefire modalities. Yet often, women’sexpertise and priorities are excluded from formal ceasefire agreements and monitoring mechanisms.This exclusion is informed by the assumption that discussion on ceasefire requires technical knowledgeon military skills.
Date:
A time-use survey has not previously been conducted in Afghanistan. As a result, there are data gaps on the contribution to human well-being by Afghan women through their unpaid cooking, cleaning and caring for family as well as their contribution to family businesses. Their work is statistically unrecognized despite the large amounts of women’s time that it consumes, and the restrictions it places on women’s ability to engage in other activities.
Date:
These Action Cards provide practical actions for frontline service providers to consider and apply when they support women migrant workers who are at risk of, or subjected to violence. These 10 things in the Action Cards are based on the international principles and standards including the Essential Services Package for Women and Girls Subject to Violence with specific consideration of the needs of women migrant workers.
Date:
This document details how the work of Htoi Gender and Development Foundation has been crucial in sustaining the livelihoods of the women in camps of internationally displaced people in Kachin State and supporting the economic empowerment of the most vulnerable women during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Date:
Bringing together the views of over 800 Afghan women, from eight provinces and various social groups, this study aims to highlight the perspectives of the Afghan women on the peace process, to better inform political elites and decision makers of their concerns; thus, facilitating informed decisions during the intra-Afghan peace negotiations with the Taliban.
Date:
Women play diverse roles in the context of armed conflict; as culturally designated caregivers, women must struggle to support their families and keep their households together while the breadwinners fight, or are apprehended or killed. Women and girls are equally affected in a fragile environment where social services and other basic needs become harder/impossible to fulfil. As a primary provider, women are exposed to further abuse.
Date:
Beyond Kabul: Women peacebuilders’ reflections on the peace process and the impact of COVID-19
Date:
This second edition of the newsletter, covering August - October, reflects our transit from an immediate rapid response to COVID-19, to a longer-term programmatic focus operating in the peace-development-humanitarian nexus. At this critical time, we worked with the Ministry of Public Health to ensure all COVID-19 hospitals and quarantine centers now have a separate room for women survivors of violence. We listened to our women’s rights activists on the ground and our call for ideas.
Date:
In contemporary peacebuilding missions, such as that in Afghanistan, local ownership has been framed as the extent to which domestic actors control the design and implementation of the processes. What happens when local actors are not involved in its design? What happens when they begin to oppose it? And how much of the achievements under liberal frameworks and institutions are self-sustainable when international peacebuilders leave?