8
results found
1 - 8 of 8 Results
Date:
Skills development is key to economic empowerment of women migrant workers and improvements of their lives in Thailand and after returning to their countries of origin. Especially during the COVID-19 pandemic, skills development become more necessary and should be given to women migrant workers to overcome inequalities in economic and social development which are increasingly exacerbated. Skills development can improve productivity and help women migrant workers diversify their employment opportunities enhancing their possibilities to secure employment during the crisis and as part of recovery.
Date:
Effective coordination and referrals are essential to respond to the needs of women migrant workers subject to violence. Safe and Fair has created a regional service directory for this purpose. The service directory enables referrals of women, including women migrant workers survivors of violence, by sharing information on available violence against women (VAW) specialized service providers across the region.
Date:
Now, nearly a decade later, the TRIANGLE in ASEAN programme (ILO) and Safe and Fair programme (ILO and UN Women) have conducted a similar survey of 4,099 nationals to track trends of attitudes in three of the above countries. One of the original four countries was changed, with the Republic of Korea replaced by Japan, given its emergence as an important destination country for low-skilled migrant workers in Asia. Certain questions from the first survey were repeated to allow for identification...
Date:
Domestic workers, the vast majority of whom are women and girls, make a critical contribution to societies and economies across the world. Still, domestic work is typically not regarded as work and is often excluded from full protection under labour legislation and social security provisions. It is usually carried out for private households, often without clear terms of employment, leaving...
Date:
With the purpose to eliminate gender stereotypes in justice delivery as a critical component of promoting women’s access to justice, this paper seeks to develop critical understanding among judges and other justice actors on gender stereotypes, and how it could be avoid, as well as to provide judicial training programmes for justice actors in investigation and adjudication.
Date:
Women’s representation in newsrooms in many countries across the Asia and the Pacific region has been slowly but surely improving over the years. However, media in the region continue to be male-dominated, especially towards the top of organizational hierarchies, both editorial and management. Women are still more or less marginalised in the news media, in terms of the content of their jobs and in the opportunities they get to develop their skills and advance in their careers. They also tend to be sidelined in the professional unions that are supposed to represent them.
Date:
This paper enshrines the concept of equality through CEDAW to provide a resource for the ASEAN Intergovernmental Human Rights Commission (AICHR) in its engagement with the ASEAN governments using international standards in promoting and protecting the human rights of women and girl children.
Date:
Addressing violence against women will require the allocation of necessary resources for training, for shelters, for social work and for curriculum reform within the education system; while bring changes to the administration of the law, with better trained judges, more sensitive to the social and economic realities of the people that are served by the justice system; with greater efficiency in policing and court processes, with better access to justice all of which is necessary for the maintenance of the rule of law; and finally people must understand the intent and purpose of legal change, think and act in the language of respect for the common humanity and human rights for all...