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This advocacy brief was developed by representatives from women’s civil society organizations (CSOs), digital rights organizations, think tanks, academia and cyber-defenders in Southeast Asia, with the support of UN Women. It emphasizes the importance of cybersecurity and its gendered implications for implementing the Women, Peace and Security agenda
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The impacts of multiple, overlapping crises arising from climate change, pandemics and conflict disproportionately affect women, exacerbate existing inequalities and deepen power imbalances. In contexts where disasters and conflict risks intersect, responses need to recognize that women perform various roles in disaster and conflict prevention, have access to different information and services, and are impacted differently — yet they are overwhelmingly excluded from decision-making processes and mechanisms.
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UN Women and UNDP have piloted a training programme on Non-Violent Communication – a method which has found success in international mediation and conflict resolution settings – in Bangladesh, the Maldives and Sri Lanka. The project was generously supported by the Government of Australia and the European Union. This brief provides an overview of the approaches used in the pilot project and presents results from the evaluations of the trainings.
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The COVID-19 pandemic has increased the extent to which women peace builders use ICT and digital solutions to support their work. Although gender biases in these technologies hinder equal and safe online engagement, digital peace building and online civic engagement are venues for increased opportunities for women peace builders to advance their work. Digital solutions will play important roles in several key peace building areas. This brief outlines some of the challenges and opportunities that AI carries for the implementation of the Women, Peace and Security agenda in Southeast Asia.
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The regional project Empowering Women for Sustainable Peace: Preventing Violence and Promoting Social Cohesion in ASEAN aims to achieve the ultimate goal that ASEAN Member States will advance and strengthen the implementation of the WPS agenda, including preventing violence against women and girls and promoting social cohesion in the region.
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The regional project Empowering Women for Sustainable Peace seeks to operationalize a simple but revolutionary idea first introduced in the landmark United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000) – that peace is inextricably linked to equality between men and women.
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Gender-responsive procurement (GRP) is the selection of services, goods and civil works that considers their impact on gender equality and women’s empowerment.
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The fall of Afghanistan’s government to Taliban rule has further limited the ability of women and girls to exercise their rights, forcing many to flee their homes, seeking safety either elsewhere within the country or in neighbouring countries. This factsheet examines the needs, fears, and barriers encountered by Afghan women and girls who are internally displaced or who have fled abroad. It is the first in a series that will examine the changing situation in Afghanistan as additional data become available. It was produced by the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).
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Women’s Entrepreneurship for Sustainable Energy programme aims to mitigate the barriers Indian women face as entrepreneurs and consumers of clean energy, by partnering with producers, stakeholders and distributors in energy value chains. Since 2017, UN Women has undertaken various efforts to provide clean energy through this programme. One such process was partnering with S4S Technologies and implementing the Promoting Women’s Entrepreneurship through Solar Drying project.
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Human trafficking is an issue that transcends national borders. Women and girls are disproportionately affected by this crime. Although research shows that increasing the number of women in law enforcement results in law enforcement that is more responsive to women’s needs and more operationally effective, women represent a small share of law enforcement officers in the ASEAN Region ranging from 6% in Indonesia to 20% in Lao PDR. In 2017, UN Women and UNODC set out to jointly mitigate these challenges, leading up to a four-year partnership between the agencies.
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The “UN Women impact stories series”, updated quarterly, illustrates the human impact of UN Women’s work across Asia and the Pacific, highlighting the partnerships that make this work possible. These stories share how we and our many partners are striding forward to realize a better world for women and girls—one of equality and empowerment because that is what we do and who we are, as a leader, mobilizer, convenor, and provider of programmes.
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Globally, women have long been at the frontlines of conflict and crisis, often leading and participatingin negotiations with parties in conflict to arrive at truce and ceasefire modalities. Yet often, women’sexpertise and priorities are excluded from formal ceasefire agreements and monitoring mechanisms.This exclusion is informed by the assumption that discussion on ceasefire requires technical knowledgeon military skills.
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In Asia and the Pacific, women experience significant barriers to participating in public and political life. Due to economic, social and cultural factors, women’s political representation in the region remains comparatively low, and the COVID-19 pandemic is aggravating pre-existing obstacles for women’s public engagement. A direct threat to women’s political participation is online hate speech and misogyny.
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Along with the Timor-Leste government’s effort in advancing the agenda of NAP 1325 in UNSCR on Women, Peace and Security, there has been an escalation on the number of women’s participation in the decision making and peace building role started from the community, up to the institutional level.
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The policy brief highlights the key barriers that women entrepreneurs and MSMEs are facing in Bangladesh; and how the overall situation deteriorated further due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
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[Commemorating 20 years of UN Security Council Resolution 1325] - On 25 August 2017, the military offensive in Rakhine state, Myanmar, targeting the Rohingya escalated and the violence unleashed upon them forced them to flee across the border to Bangladesh. To date 861,545 Rohingya refugees live in camps in Cox’s Bazar, over half of which are women and girls and an estimated 80% of whom are women and children.
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Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, violence against women and girls has intensified globally. Analysis of social media suggests that the same is true for online misogyny and hate speech directed at women in South and South-East Asia. As COVID-19 lockdowns and other movement restrictions push more people online, digital platforms and online spaces are being increasingly used to spread sexist, inaccurate, and dangerous rhetoric about women, inciting hatred and potentially provoking violence – online and offline. This brief examines the links between the COVID-19 pandemic and online misogyny and hate speech directed at women in South and South-East Asia for the period of March – June 2020. It is based on the findings of research conducted by Mythos Labs for UN Women Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.
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The 20th anniversary of the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda is a critical moment for the agenda and its relevance, which has been tested by the extensive impacts of COVID-19. This publication takes stock of the progress as well as the gaps in implementing WPS in the Asia Pacific region over the last 20 years, and builds upon the lessons learned to move the WPS agenda forward in the years to come.
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Women are on the COVID-19 frontlines as healthcare workers, caretakers and community responders. In formal decision-making, however, women’s representation is far less visible. Only one in five parliamentary seats in Asia are held by women, and men hold the majority of health leadership positions. This gender disparity has been further highlighted during the COVID-19 crisis when, with very few exceptions, women are overwhelmingly missing from pandemic response and recovery.
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This brief explores key ways that the work of WHRDs has been impacted by the COVID-19 crisis, and how countries can ensure the work of WHRDs is recognized and protected during this time.