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This publication showcases the results of Rapid Gender Assessment surveys (RGAs) on the impact of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in seven countries in Asia and the Pacific. For some of these countries, this is the second round of RGAs and thus these findings may follow up those of “Unlocking the Lockdown”. The report is meant to be a statistical snapshot that could inform responses to the crisis but is not meant to provide policy recommendations or analyze the policy context in each country.
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The brief showcases the contributions of UN Women Viet Nam in supporting and working with the Government of Viet Nam, civil society, and other stakeholders to advance gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls in Viet Nam. The brief is meant to be accessible to any reader by providing an introduction to UN Women and what we do; by sharing the about impact on 4 areas of our work: Policy Advocacy, Programmes, Coordination, and Outreach.
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This research used a mixed methods approach with a strong focus on the qualitative to investigate the diverse perceptions and experiences among the Rohingya and host communities, addressing different dimensions of empowerment, motivations and catalysts that contributed to the perceptions, attitudes, behaviours, influencing factors, and parties that drive positive and negative change.
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This review comprised chiefly of desk research. To determine whether the Philippines has complied with its state obligations, the study used the UN-identified CEDAW indicators contained in the handbook entitled Do Our Laws Promote Gender Equality?
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Sexual harassment and other forms of sexual violence in public spheres are an everyday occurrence for women and girls around the world – in urban and rural areas, in developed and developing countries.
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Violence against women is a global phenomenon and Viet Nam is no exception as it is a daily occurrence in the lives of many Vietnamese girls and women. As stipulated in international and regional legal instruments, the duty and priority to protect girls and women from domestic violence lies with the Government. The Government of Viet Nam has acknowledged its responsibilities and signed international conventions including the Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women and the International Convention on Economic,Social and Cultural Rights. In addition, the Government has also explicitly recognized the equal rights of women across public and private domains in their Constitution adopted in 1992. However, despite the attention to domestic violence in the legislative framework, it is still broadly understood as the violence that occurs within the family in the Vietnamese cultural context.