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The Peace Village Initiative, implemented by the Wahid Foundation since 2017 with the support of UN Women and other donors, is an ambitious initiative that aims to address the drivers of extremism among women by mobilizing community members, especially women, to promote social cohesion across Java Island in Indonesia.
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The fall of Afghanistan’s government to Taliban rule has further limited the ability of women and girls to exercise their rights, forcing many to flee their homes, seeking safety either elsewhere within the country or in neighbouring countries. This factsheet examines the needs, fears, and barriers encountered by Afghan women and girls who are internally displaced or who have fled abroad. It is the first in a series that will examine the changing situation in Afghanistan as additional data become available. It was produced by the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).
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This Guidance Note on Gender-responsive conflict analysis initially developed in Afghanistan has global applicability. It provides recommendations on how to apply a gender lens in political and conflict analysis in a way that allows the integration of gender as a variable of power across a social, political, economic analysis of conflict as opposed to addressing issues specific to women and girls in siloed analysis. This approach reveals the critical links between gender dynamics of conflict and peacebuilding.
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This is the third edition of UN Women Indonesia’s newsletter, capturing a series of initiatives from October 2021 to January 2022. During this time, UN Women created a new partnership with the Government Investment Center to accelerate the economic empowerment of women's ultra-micro businesses in Indonesia.
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Globally, women have long been at the frontlines of conflict and crisis, often leading and participatingin negotiations with parties in conflict to arrive at truce and ceasefire modalities. Yet often, women’sexpertise and priorities are excluded from formal ceasefire agreements and monitoring mechanisms.This exclusion is informed by the assumption that discussion on ceasefire requires technical knowledgeon military skills.
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This is the second edition of UN Women Indonesia’s newsletter, capturing a series of initiatives during Q4 2020 - Q1 2021 and in support of International Women’s Day.
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In order to become a Peace Village, members within a community commit to promoting and fostering tolerance and peace within their communities. Starting with making peace within the family, members then agree on guidelines to enhance social cohesion in the community.
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Bringing together the views of over 800 Afghan women, from eight provinces and various social groups, this study aims to highlight the perspectives of the Afghan women on the peace process, to better inform political elites and decision makers of their concerns; thus, facilitating informed decisions during the intra-Afghan peace negotiations with the Taliban.
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Women play diverse roles in the context of armed conflict; as culturally designated caregivers, women must struggle to support their families and keep their households together while the breadwinners fight, or are apprehended or killed. Women and girls are equally affected in a fragile environment where social services and other basic needs become harder/impossible to fulfil. As a primary provider, women are exposed to further abuse.
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Beyond Kabul: Women peacebuilders’ reflections on the peace process and the impact of COVID-19
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In contemporary peacebuilding missions, such as that in Afghanistan, local ownership has been framed as the extent to which domestic actors control the design and implementation of the processes. What happens when local actors are not involved in its design? What happens when they begin to oppose it? And how much of the achievements under liberal frameworks and institutions are self-sustainable when international peacebuilders leave?
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Welcome to the first issue of UN Women Indonesia’s newsletter, launched during one of the most difficult times for our team, our partners and the communities we serve. In this edition, UN Women Indonesia’s newsletter covering: - How women’s groups in Peace Villages across Java have been taking initiatives to assist each other during pandemic. - UN Women and the European Union Deliver Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and Prevention of Violence Information Materials...
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UN Women and UNFPA, with contributions from the UNAMA, the International Legal Foundation (ILF) and Human Rights Watch (HRW), issue this 14th alert to continue to highlight the gender specific impacts of COVID-19 in Afghanistan. This alert focuses on the impact of COVID-19 on women and girls in prisons and detention settings, including girls in juvenile rehabilitation centers (JRCs).
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The Gender Alerts series highlights the disproportionate gender specific impacts of COVID-19 in Afghanistan, from the lack of services for survivors of violence to the challenges of building peace during a health crisis and a fast-paced rise in the burden of unpaid care work.
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This alert focuses on a pillar of the women, peace and security agenda of particular relevance in Afghanistan today – participation. Specifically, the alert engages stakeholders on how to collectively ensure women’s meaningful participation in an intra-Afghan peace process.
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This report presents novel research findings – possibly the first such robust findings to date – on the relationship between support for misogyny, violence against women, and extremist violence in Bangladesh, Indonesia and the Philippines.
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This report presents research findings on gender and violent extremism in the Philippines, Bangladesh, and Indonesia. The aim of the research is to examine women’s roles in supporting, countering, and preventing violent extremism and how gender identities and relations may be used to garner support for intolerant social attitudes and groups as well as recruitment to violent extremist groups.
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This alert focuses on the implications of COVID-19 from a women, peace and security (WPS) perspective. It highlights the urgent need to ensure the continued implementation of Afghanistan’s National Action Plan on United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 (2019-2021), as well as how its implementation can contribute to long-term responses to COVID-19 that promote gender equality.
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Violent extremism has emerged as one of the leading challenges to the realization of sustainable peace globally. Across South and South-East Asia, violent extremism poses a direct threat to inclusive development by fuelling intolerance, forcibly displacing communities, exacerbating cycles of insecurity and armed conflict, exploiting existing inequalities, and obstructing the enjoyment of human rights and the rule of law. Underpinning this violence are gender stereotypes that are used to radicalize and recruit men and women, as well as girls and boys, to violent extremist groups.
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The Peace Village Initiative is a women-led initiative to promote peaceful and resilient communities. The idea of Peace Villages was conceived by UN Women and the Indonesian NGO Wahid Foundation, and implemented under UN Women’s regional programme “Empowered Women, Peaceful Communities”, funded by the government of Japan. There are now ten Peace Villages across Indonesia, and the idea continues to spread.