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UN Women Indonesia rolled out the project from June 2020 through May 2021. At the end of the project, 610 women benefited from the cash-based interventions, 100 women received advocacy and leadership training, and more than 100 individuals received knowledge on coordinated quality services to better support and empower women's migrant workers. In addition, 11 women’s crisis centers and shelters across the country were supported to ensure that services for women’s survivors of violence could continue during the pandemic.
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This glossary serves as a guide for journalists, researchers, trainers and other stakeholders who conduct trainings or write about women’s labour migration, and who write about violence against women in the context of migration. Language used in different communication materials and trainings puts forward specific positions and impressions, including at times perpetuating stereotypes. Thus, it is crucial to be clear about terms and definitions related to women migrant workers.
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The infographic was based on a policy research “Leveraging Digitalization to cope with COVID-19: An Indonesia case study on women-owned micro and small businesses” by UN Women in partnership with Pulse Lab Jakarta and Gojek, with the support of National Council for Financial Inclusion of Indonesia (S-DNKI).
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Along with the growing conversation around gender lens investment (GLI), there is a common perception that GLI concept is a niche practice of women investing in women to achieve equal access to capital.However, GLI practice is so much more than this.
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The infographic was based on the survey on the socio-economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on women and men launched through SMS messages via Indosat Ooredoo mobile network, during April and July 2020 to collect data from randomly selected cellphone users with a link to a web-based survey. The report “Counting the Costs of COVID-19: Assessing the Impact on Gender and the Achievement of the SDGs in Indonesia” reveals how COVID-19 is exposing women’s vulnerabilities to...
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For women in Indonesia and indeed around the world, starting or running a business is never easy. Limited access to skills development, barriers to securing financial capital to set up or grow their businesses, accessing business networks often dominated by men, are all challenges due to discriminatory and cultural norms.
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According to new report from UN Women Asia Pacific on gender impact of COVID-19, the pandemic is triggering a mental health crisis in the region, as the emotional impact of the pandemic unduly falls on women’s shoulders in most countries. Increases in unpaid work, job and income loss, and the effects of the lockdown on gender-based violence are among the factors that may be contributing to higher rates of stress and anxiety among women.
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The brief on Gender Based Violence against Women Migrant Workers was derived from Indonesian Ministry of Women’s Empowerment and Child Protections’ Protocols in Handling the Case of Gender Based Violence and Trafficking of Women Migrant Workers during the COVID-19, supported by UN Women.
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Women are paid less than men globally, with the gender pay gap estimated at 16 percent. Women earn 77 cents for every dollar men earn for work of equal value – with an even wider gap for women with children. These discrepancies in pay have negative consequences for women and their families - a situation that is exacerbated during the COVID-19 pandemic.