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The ASEAN Regional Framework on Protection, Gender, and Inclusion in Disaster Management 2021-2025 (ARF-PGI) aims to articulate a common vision for promoting PGI in disaster management in the ASEAN region, in line with One ASEAN One Response. The Framework aims to support the implementation of the ASEAN Agreement on Disaster Management and Emergency Response (AADMER) Work Programme 2021-2025 and other regional declarations and plans by: Consolidating regional commitments across sectors on...
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The Review report on the implementation of the National Strategy on Gender Equality (NSGE) 2011-2020 presents an overall review in realizing the objectives, targets and solutions of the NSGE 2011-2020 which serve as a basis for devising NSGE 2021-2030. In addition, the report provides analyses on achievements coupled with obstacles and challenges in the implementation of the NSGE 2011-2020 at various levels of national, ministerial/sectoral and local levels.
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The 8th Constitutional Government adopted the second Maubisse Declaration on the 12th of October 2018 in commemoration of International Day for Rural Women. This poster highlights the commitments made by 17 institutions who signed the Declaration for improving the lives of rural women and girls over a five-year period (2018-2023).
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This publication has been developed within the framework of the project entitled Empowerment of Ethnic Minority Women and Girls Through Gender Responsive Budgeting Policies And Programmes, as a project between the Department of Ethnic Minority Affairs of the Committee for Ethnic Minority Affairs (CEMA) and UN Women with financial support from Irish Aid in Viet Nam.
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This publication was developed out of the context of a new State Budget Law approved in 2015 which offered new and advanced articles of law from a gender perspective. The guidelines outlined in this Document aim to provide a basic knowledge of gender, gender equality and GRB and thus, offer skills with which to apply gender equality principles in budget monitoring and decisions of the People’s Council to conform to State Budget Law (2015).
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The National Action Plan on Gender Based Violence 2017-2021 (NAP GBV) is the second NAP on GBV and was developed under leadership by the Secretary of State for the Support and Socio-Economic Promotion of Women serves as a guide for the Government's actions to prevent and respond to gender-based violence over the next five years. Through the new NAP GBV, the coordination mechanism between line ministries will be improved in effort to promote gender-based equality at national and municipal...
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Violence against women and girls (VAWG) has been clearly established as a serious issue facing the majority of women and girls in Afghanistan with deadly, disabling, and long term consequences; not only for women, but for children, families, future generations, communities and society as a whole. VAWG deprives families and communities of peace and limits nearly half the population from fully participating in the betterment of society. Eliminating VAWG is a critical part of the development...
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There is now a large body of sociological evidence that demonstrates that knowledge and attitudes are not necessarily the best predictor of human behaviour.11 In other words, just because someone believes that women should be in parliament, does not mean that they will vote for a female candidate on election day. This is supported by research in Solomon Islands, which clearly shows that high levels of notional support for women’s political participation do not translate into votes for...
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Summary on how United Nations in Thailand workings to improve girls and women lives and rights.
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From agriculture to traditional crafts, rural women sustain the informal sector in a variety of ways.
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Evaluation findings suggest that UN Women's collaboration with the Positive Women's Network (PWN+) from 2006 to 2011 was instrumental in providing a safespace, counseling, health and income generating services to women living with HIV.
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The call for a transformative framework to achieve women’s rights and gender equality comes in the midst of a global conversation about the legacy and next steps after the MDGs. Intergovernmental and UN-led processes are currently under way to inform and design a post-2015 development agenda and SDGs.
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This publication is meant to serve as a ready reference on the country-specific legal protections that exist for women migrant workers in source and destination countries in the programmeme countries of UN Women’s Asia & Arab States Regional programmeme on Empowering Women Migrant Workers in Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Jordan, Lao PDR, Nepal, Philippines. In addition, destination countries and territories such as Bahrain, Hong Kong SAR, UAE, Singapore and Thailand were included.
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Violence and especially sexual violence against rural left behind girls is on the rise. Rural left behind girls have been left by their parents in rural areas while they go search for employment in urban areas. These girls do not have proper awareness of sexual violence or how to protect themselves, and with little or no guardianship are severely vulnerable to being taken advantage of. Rural left behind girls and migrant girls are China’s top two targeted groups for trafficking.
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It is important to distinguish between migration, smuggling and trafficking, because of the misperceptions that men migrate and women are trafficked – although men are also trafficked and increasing numbers of women are migrating independently.
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International migration, especially of women migrant workers is driven by, among other factors: the search for decent jobs (Priority 1); access to resources including energy sources and water (Priorities 2 and 5); the urbanization drive that sees men and women and their families migrate internationally from rural areas in countries of origin to cities in countries of destination (Priority 3); food insecurity and unsustainable agricultural systems (Priority 4); and climate change and environmental degradation (linked to priorities 2, and 5-7).
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International Conventions and Human Rights Standards in the Framework:1. CEDAW: The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women2. GR No. 26: the CEDAW Committee’s General Recommendation No. 26 on Women Migrant Workers3. ICRMW: International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families4. GC No. 1: the Committee on Migrant Workers’ General Comment No. 1 on Migrant Domestic Workers
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International Conventions and Regional Human Rights Standards in the Framework: CEDAW: The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women GR No. 26: the CEDAW Committee’s General Recommendation No. 26 on Women Migrant Workers ICRMW: International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families GC No. 1: the Committee on Migrant Workers’ General Comment No. 1 on Migrant Domestic Workers ASEAN Declaration: The ASEAN Declaration on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Migrant Workers
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Women represent two thirds of the poor in Asia. Over 50% of all international migrants in Asia are women – the bulk of whom are employed as domestic workers.
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Women’s migration in search of decent work and sustainable livelihoods, to support themselves and their families has become an enduring structural feature of international migration, which is set to be one of the mega-trends of the 21st century. The “feminization” of migration is most visible in Asia, where women – especially young women - constitute over half of all migrant workers. In Nepal, women represent over 68% of migrants, while in Indonesia this figure is even higher – 83%. Domestic work is the dominant profession for migrant women with women representing 83% of domestic workers worldwide.