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The call for a transformative framework to achieve women’s rights and gender equality comes in the midst of a global conversation about the legacy and next steps after the MDGs. Intergovernmental and UN-led processes are currently under way to inform and design a post-2015 development agenda and SDGs.
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International Conventions and Human Rights Standards in the Framework:1. CEDAW: The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women2. GR No. 26: the CEDAW Committee’s General Recommendation No. 26 on Women Migrant Workers3. ICRMW: International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families4. GC No. 1: the Committee on Migrant Workers’ General Comment No. 1 on Migrant Domestic Workers
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In a village meeting in August 2010 in Maharashtra, India, a woman farmer in the presence of thirty women and twenty-one men said: “When the land is in my husband’s name, I am only a worker.
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Rural, indigenous people live in two simultaneous situations. While they have highly developed capabilities for management of biodiverse natural resources, they are lodged in a discriminated, excluded existence, away from the centre stage of economic and technological change.
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The handbook reflects actual needs as per the law enforcement agencies to prevent trafficking of women and children, and rehabilitate them. Trafficking does not mean prostitution. They are not synonymous. In understanding trafficking, one should delink it from prostitution. As per the existing law, Immoral Traffic (Prevention) Act 1956 (ITPA) prostitution becomes an offence when there is commercial exploitation of a person. If a woman or child is sexually exploited and any person gains out of the same, it amounts to commercial sexual exploitation (CSE), which is a legally punishable offence wherein the culpability lies against all