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GiHA Bangladesh designed this checklist to support the Humanitarian Coordination Task Team (HCTT) and humanitarian practitioners in integrating gender equality in their disaster preparedness efforts for the monsoon and cyclone season in Bangladesh.
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This is an initiative of the Gender in Humanitarian action working group (GiHA) Bangladesh co-chaired by UN Women Bangladesh and the Department of Women’s Affairs of the government of Bangladesh.
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The impacts of climate change, environmental degradation and disasters are unequally felt across Asia and the Pacific region. Women and marginalized groups have less access to information, resources, finance and technologies, leaving them with greater challenges in coping and rebuilding after a crisis.
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Four Technical Briefs have been developed by Practical Action, one of the responsible parties of UN Women Bangladesh under “EmPower: Women for Climate Resilient Societies” project. The technical briefs were developed on four livelihood options for women farmers with an aim to document the innovation and the local knowledge that was transformed during the project implementation.
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To better understand the differential conditions, risks, and impacts in disaster situations in Southeast Asia, this research on the Gender and Age Inequality of Disaster Risk in Southeast Asia was conducted in 2021, building upon methodology developed through the global study developed in this area by UN Women, UNICEF, and Practical Action. The research aimed to consolidate and analyze information on the gendered and generational nature of disaster risks in preparing for, withstanding, and recovering from disasters in the region during this last decade, and presents key findings and recommendations to advance gender-responsive DRR in the region.
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‘State of Gender Equality and Climate Change in Bangladesh’ policy brief is based on the assessment report for Bangladesh and presents the essential findings and recommendations for policy actors to promote gender equality in climate action. It aims to strengthen country-driven processes by presenting evidence on the linkages between gender equality and climate change. It analyses the gendered impacts of climate change and the gender gaps in sectoral policies.
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This brief provides an overview of the Rights of Nature, how the global movement is being translated into regional action, and its connection with indigenous knowledge and systems of living in harmony with nature. 
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Gender inequality is known to make women suffer disproportionately from the adverse effects of climate change; with social, economic and political barriers increasing women’s exposure and susceptibility to the negative impacts of climate change.
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Gender inequality is known to make women suffer disproportionately from the adverse effects of climate change; with social, economic and political barriers increasing women’s exposure and susceptibility to the negative impacts of climate change.
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In the Asia-Pacific region, climate change and climate-induced disasters continue to ravage the lives and livelihoods of over 4 billion people. Increasingly dependent on natural resources, communities relying on agriculture, forestry, fisheries are at the frontlines of climate change. Polluting fossil fuels, often sources of energy, contribute to almost 60% of greenhouse gas emissions.
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With a decade to go for the 2030 goalpost, there is an urgent need to galvanize political will, institutional commitments and individual action for the world to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Tackling climate change, making strides on gender equality and building resilient communities are critical priorities for the Asia-Pacific region.
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Climate change and disasters are one of the defining challenges of our times. In Asia-Pacific, it is profoundly shaping the lives of communities, impacting food security, nutrition, clean water, health and livelihoods of women, men and marginalized groups. In particular, rural women, children, older persons, persons with disabilities, ethnic minorities and other disadvantaged groups bear a heavier burden of climate change, due to social inequalities that limit them.