Stories

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[Press release] During the virtual event held on 12 May 2022 to launch the 2022 WEPs campaign, both parties reiterated the importance of having a holistic approach to implementing gender-inclusive strategies that span an organisation’s value chain and impact the wider business ecosystem.
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[Press release] The Elsie Initiative Fund for Uniformed Women in Peace Operations (EIF) announced today that Cambodia will receive funding to undertake a study to identify barriers to the deployment of women in the Royal Cambodian Armed Forces (RCAF), to United Nations peace operations. Cambodia, the 25th highest troop contributing country to United Nations peacekeeping, currently deploys 766 military personnel, among which 14 per cent are women.
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2016 was the year I embraced who I am, it was the year I joined the equality for all movement, and it was the year I asked myself who am I? My name is Thida Kuy, I am Cambodian, I am the Co-Founder of Loveisdiversity and I am a LGBTQ+ activist.
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I first really become aware of feminism and women’s empowerment was the Emma Watson speech at the HeForShe campaign in 2014, when I was 16. That speech had a big impact on me and to girls and women everywhere. I also grew up in a very matriarchal family, my mother was the boss, my grandmother was the boss, my brother is a bit terrified of me sometimes, I think. But I guess I didn’t realise that until I saw that speech. So, I started reading more, educating myself, and as I read I encountered gender-based violence (GBV).
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My name is Sinoun Poev. I am 26 years old and I am from Cambodia. Currently I'm a project coordinator of Collective Action to Support Women's Right with Alliance for Conflict Transformation (ACT), a local NGO in Cambodia. This project aims to link the community and civil society to government by increasing women and youth participation and leadership in decision making processes in Cambodia.
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There is a Cambodian proverb: “A man is gold; a woman is a white piece of cloth.” The implication is that gold (men) can be made clean and shiny if dropped in mud, but the cloth (women) is stained and ruined. This saying mirrors the sentiment of generations in our country’s society and their view on female sexuality. This portrayal of women’s sexuality is one example of how women often lack their sexual rights and autonomy.
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I am the founder of Monsters Among Us, a Malaysian youth-led non-governmental organization. As the name indicates, we combat child sexual abuse and violence and sexual and gender-based violence in Malaysia. Our niche area is child protection.
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Eight outstanding Malaysian private-sector companies and corporate leaders were celebrated as gender champions of the 2021 Malaysia WEPs Award Ceremony on 29 October 2021. The champions were among applicants evaluated by a panel of six high-calibre judges from investment organizations, boards of directors, the community, academics, finance, women and youth empowerment.
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Economies in Asia and the Pacific will recover faster from the COVID-19 pandemic if more women are appointed at the top of supply chains, and women’s opportunities are prioritized throughout the workplace.
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More than 150 business people, officials and civil society representatives took part in the launch of the campaign Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs) Activator Malaysia, aimed at enabling a gender-inclusive culture and implementing the WEPs in Malaysian businesses. 
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Dok: “I have worked on numerous construction sites in Thailand for the last 20 years. I am a hard worker with a good reputation with my supervisors. After the COVID-19 outbreak, my work situation quickly deteriorated. Many construction projects were halted in March-April and, of course, this meant no work and no income for me. My colleagues and I stopped working around the time Cambodia celebrated the Khmer New Year. I wanted to be with my family during this difficult time, so I decided...
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Tenaganita is a civil society organization specialized in case management related to violence, exploitation and abuse of women migrant workers. They work to protect the rights of migrants, support survivors of trafficking in persons and also provide shelters for survivors of violence.
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Interview with Kong Ravin, Deputy Chief of Unit of the Anti-Human Trafficking and Juvenile Protection Bureau, Provincial Police Commissioner, Kandal Province, Cambodia.
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The Women’s Aid Organization is a civil society organization which aims to end violence against women and promote gender equality in Malaysia. WAO operates helplines for survivors of violence against women, to any women who need support including women migrant workers, informing the survivors about their rights and available options, support them to make informed decisions.
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Cambodia marked International Women’s Day with a Khmer pop music concert and a digital campaign inspired by the HeForShe initiative, a global movement inviting men and people of all genders to stand in solidarity with women to create a bold, visible and united force for a world with gender equality.
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Christian Ewert is President of amfori, a global business association for open and sustainable trade. amfori groups over 2,400 retailers, importers, brands and associations of more than 40 countries, with a combined turnover of more than 1 trillion euros. amfori recently signed the Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs), which UN Women and United Nations Global Compact developed to guide private companies to create gender-equal workplaces.
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On the road winding into Chreng village in Cambodia’s Pursat province, a group of boys are playing volleyball on an arid plot of land as villagers watch and cheer. Around the corner, 24-year-old Lang Sokang is knee-deep in mulch, unearthing weeds and planting herbs in her garden. Her younger sisters are perched precariously on a wooden platform that serves as a makeshift greenhouse. The girls are carefully transplanting the saplings into little organic cups. In two weeks, the saplings will be ready to be planted in the ground. The sisters tend to the garden after returning from the rice fields in the morning. While they work steadily, a group of men from the village are drinking nearby in merry revelry.
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“Livestock and rice fields of villagers were damaged,” recalled Kanha, “but the drowning death of a 7 year-old girl was heart-breaking for me.” The girl’s death brought grief to the community in Kampot, the southern Cambodia city where Kanha is Deputy District Governor. When a disaster hits, boys and girls, and men and women have distinct vulnerabilities, and this shapes the way the experience and recover from a disaster. One such vulnerability is gender inequality.
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As a young man, Vutha Phon was troubled to learn that so many women and girls in his country had suffered from gang rape. Even boys assaulting girls. His mother told him about how in the forced-labour fields of the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s, women were swiftly slaughtered after being raped. Phon is now putting to work his longstanding commitment to help survivors of violence as an officer overseeing the Cambodia project of the UN joint Global Programme on Essential Services for Women and Girls Subject to Violence.
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“I used to have a rice field, but then I borrowed money and put my land as collateral to build a house. My husband did not help, so I had to find a way to pay the debt on my own. In the past, he was very violent, and I could not say anything. Even though I did not want to, I was considering leaving my daughter behind with my parents to migrate to Thailand to find work and pay my debts. Instead, I heard about a programme through CWCC.