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In the spirit of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games, the Japanese Center for Research on Women in Sport (JCRWS) of Juntendo University co-organised the Open Symposium on Gender Equality in Sports with the Japan Sports Agency (JSA) and ASEAN Secretariat, and support from the UN Women. The Symposium is part of the four-day ASEAN-Japan Workshop on Gender Equality in Sports held from 10 to 13 August.
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RPTC is a state-run center for migrant workers especially those who are survivors of trafficking in persons, under the Ministry of Social Affairs. RPTC runs a shelter for survivors, provides medical care, psychological support including psychological assessments and counselling, organizes life skill training for Indonesian migrant workers and coordinates referrals to relevant institutions as needed.
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Interview with Karmila Jusup, social worker at the Pasundan-Durebang Women’s Crisis Centre in Bandung, West Java, Indonesia.
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Before I migrated, my husband gambled, and we were in debt because of it. People kept saying that I could earn a lot by working abroad, and they encouraged me to go. I thought maybe it could solve all our problems. My daughter was four at the time. I worked as a domestic worker in Malaysia, imagining that I would earn a good sum of money and build a house back home. I thought, “I'll have a good employer who will treat me well”.
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I was the first person in my family to go and work abroad and I was excited and eager to help my parents build a house with the money. I went to Saudi Arabia in 2003 and worked there for three years as a domestic worker. My employers were kind to me, but after a year the younger brother of the employer came home from college, and he started to harass me and touch me. And then he raped me. I told my employers, but they didn’t believe me. And I couldn’t leave because they had...
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Like many other women migrant workers, family was my motivation to migrate. My husband had no regular income and was not paid well enough to support our two children, my sisters and our sick father. I migrated to Qatar to work as a domestic worker. When I first arrived in Qatar, I felt like I was walking into darkness. I also thought that that was normal, however, and it was okay to feel that way.
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Like most people, earning money was my motivation to go work overseas. My first job was in Malaysia and it was not a good experience, but I lasted three years with the same employer. The second time I left was for different reasons. My husband had been unfaithful, and when I confronted him, he beat me. We divorced and he took my children from me. I thought my life couldn’t get any worse, but then my husband’s best friend raped me. I didn’t report it because I knew I would be the one who was judged.
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I first decided to go abroad to work because I was separated from my husband and wanted to support my mother, my siblings and my young son. I found a job announcement on Facebook for work overseas as a waitress in Malaysia, and I contacted the person who placed the announcement. The job looked legitimate. There were administrative requirements and procedures, and I had to provide certificates and even a sponsor letter from the head of my village. I was told that I could go in two months.
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Anis Hidayah was still a student when she picked up the newspaper one morning and read the story of a local woman who had left her young children in Indonesia to work thousands of miles away in one of the Gulf States. There she was exploited, beaten and raped by her employer. When she came home, she was treated as a social outcast and her young family was humiliated and ostracized. “That story lit a fire within me,” says Hidayah. “That could have been my mother, my family. This was one story, but there are millions of others suffering the same all over the country.”
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The 10 members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) form an economic powerhouse. The ASEAN Economic Community is now the world’s seventh-largest economy and third-largest labour force, with enormous potential for further growth. But to maximize growth, the region needs to ensure that its labour force is diversified and ready to adapt, expand and move freely. Currently, the ASEAN region is a hotspot for labour migration. It hosts a reported 9.9...
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Women migrant workers of ASEAN contribute significantly to the region’s economies. Yet many obstacles remain which must be removed to ensure their equal participation in and benefit from ASEAN economic growth and development. The ASEAN High-level Policy Dialogue on Women Migrant Workers in the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) concluded with the participation of senior officials from labour, gender, trade and foreign affairs of ASEAN Member...
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IOM X in partnership with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) today premiered Open Doors: An IOM X Production, aimed at preventing the exploitation of domestic workers in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region. “The 22-minute video carries a message to employers of domestic workers that a positive relationship with their domestic worker, based on trust and communication, helps create a happy home,” said Tara Dermott,...