Stories

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Kert Tandog has been working for two years with the Liyang Network, which raises awareness of front-line environmental activists in Mindanao. One focus is training Indigenous communities on legal literacy and land property laws.
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Through my peacebuilding work in Sulu, I connect with many different people, especially from conflict-affected and displaced communities. I am fortunate enough to have visited their homes, caught a glimpse of their lives and thus appraised their unique situations, which enables me to support them in a targeted way, and to recognize that there is a chance for peace to work...
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Aileen Kesa Marie U. Hualde grew up in an indigenous community under martial law in the southern Philippine region of Mindanao. After having to flee her own home as a child, today she is advocating for other indigenous women who are still suffering from the consequences of conflict, violence and displacement. “Where I grew up, armed conflict and violence are intertwined parts of our story as a people. I was only a young girl when we were placed under martial law. To me, this is one of the darkest periods in the history of Mindanao..."
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Narimbai Dimao, 48, is a mother and entrepreneur from Barangay Bulalo in the Bangsamoro area of the southern Philippines. She is a leader and active participant of UN Women’s programme to prevent violent extremism through women’s economic empowerment.
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Islamia N. Kamakan, 28, is a mother and new entrepreneur from the Bangsamoro region of the southern Philippines. Her family fled fighting in another village, walking three days without food, to live in the Buayan community.
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Almira Maricor, 49, is a mother and entrepreneur from Orandang community in the Bangsamoro area of the southern Philippines. Almira, along with other women from Orandang, had the courage to mobilize the local government and successfully reduce conflict in their village.
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When I was 14, my father wanted me to marry, and he engaged me to a man from our community without my consent. I said to my father, “I don’t want to marry! I want to study.” But my father said, “You cannot study because there is martial law in Mindanao.” So, I ran away and went to study religion on my own. I started working in radio in 2008, and I was the assistant host for a show. In 2015, I received training from UN Women on how women can be involved in peacebuilding, and now, I am the host of my own show. On my radio show, I ask, “What are the rights and roles of women?”...
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Sophia Dianne Garcia from the Philippines is a youth activist who teaches young people to advocate for their rights and for peace. She spoke to UN Women about what sustainable peace means for her, as part of an editorial series that presents the daily sustainable development challenges that people around the world face and how they are bringing about change. In my country, there are a lot of extremists. Very recently, in May 2017...
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Edna Valdez, 58, a former migrant domestic worker, is now the President of Bannuar Ti La Union, an organization that works for migrant women’s rights in the La Union province of Philippines. Having experienced the hardships of migration first-hand, Ms. Valdez conducts trainings in her community about migrant workers’ rights, risks of illegal recruitment and trafficking, and access to services.