Stories

16
results found
1 - 16 of 16 Results
Date:
As more individuals and young people are using digital spaces, the widespread issue of online hate speech and the tension of social cohesion amid the COVID-19 pandemic is gaining greater visibility.
Date:
Olinda Alves da Silva, 44 is part of a community of women who are pioneering a better way to provide care and support healing for women survivors of the past conflict in Timor-Leste (1975-1999), while working to prevent further violence against women.
Date:
In the past, women in Timor–Leste have had limited opportunities to be involved in conflict resolution due to customary practices that limited women’s roles in leading such processes. In advancing the Women, Peace and Security Agenda in Timor- Leste, the Ministry of Interior (responsible for internal security) is supporting women to lead as professional conflict mediators in their communities.
Date:
Whether it’s the role of women in the workplace or that of men in the home, shifting attitudes in Timor-Leste can support conflict prevention in several ways, according to local organization Belun. The group, founded in 2004, has been working with UN Women since 2017 as part of the Women, Peace and Security programme, with the generous support of the Government of Japan.
Date:
Meet Timor-Leste’s first female municipal police commander, Superintendent Natercia E. S. Martins, who earned the rank within 10 years of service with the National Police of Timor-Leste (PNTL). Her motivation and zeal has propelled her career development forward. Recalling the many opportunities she was given to develop her capacity, inside and outside the country, she noted, “My full dedication to work and serving the institution has led me to receive training opportunities and promotions.” Just within the 10 years of her career, she was honored as a municipal police commander in the Liquica. Like many working women, she has balanced her role as a police officer alongside her role as a mother.
Date:
When I was kid, I didn’t think I would be in the military. It was difficult to imagine that since we were under Indonesian occupation. Initially I wanted to be a teacher or a lawyer. When we gained our independence, I decided to pursue a degree in civilian engineering. However, after my father passed away, I stopped my studies to help take care of the family...
Date:
Timor-Leste officially launched its National Action Plan for the implementation of the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000)/ NAP UNSCR 1325, on Women Peace and Security, today, becoming the third country in Southeast Asia (after the Philippines and Indonesia) to adopt such a measure.
Date:
With the support of the Japanese Government, UN Women Timor-Leste launched a new four-year, 294 million Japanese Yen (USD 2.74 million) project that aims to support the implementation of the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 in Timor-Leste. Resolution 1325 is the first of 8 resolutions that call on Member States to recognize women’s leadership and participation in all matters of peace and security. Toward this end, the project will partner with the Ministry of Interior, Secretary of...
Date:
Timor-Leste has approved a National Action Plan for Women, Peace and Security for 2016-2020, becoming the third country in Southeast Asia to adopt such a plan based on a UN Security Council Resolution. The plan was approved by the Council of Ministers on 26 April. It covers the four pillars of Resolution 1325, adopted in the year 2000: women’s participation, prevention, protection, and peace-building. Philippines and Indonesia previously...
Date:
Surrounded by fertile mountain crops and an envelope of early morning fog, over 100 people of Holarua and Daisua villages in the sub-district of Same came together on 6 June 2014 to voice their perspectives on issues affecting security and the overall well-being of their communities. The Minister for Social...
Date:
The presence of more than 50 participants from 17 different government institutions and two civil society observers acknowledges that securing women’s meaningful role in Timor-Leste's development process is not just a commitment enshrined in Timor-Leste's Constitution and Strategic Development Plan, but is the foundation for sustaining the fragile state's future peace.
Date:
The topic of the day was women’s role in peace building and conflict transformation as established in the UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security. This resolution highlights the vulnerability of women during conflict and the importance of women’s participation in peace negotiations and peace building following conflict.
Date:
UN Women, in cooperation with SoSS, recently hosted a workshop to launch the process of developing a NAP on Security Council resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security. This historical resolution calls on states to ensure that women participate in conflict resolution and peace-building processes from the grassroots up to the national and international levels, that they are better protected from human rights violations, and that women have access to justice and services to eliminate discrimination.
Date:
Delfina is one of the many women who have been trained in conflict transformation and the Law against Domestic Violence, passed in 2010, as part of UN Women Timor-Leste’s Women, Peace and Security programme, supported by the Department for International Development (DFID) through the UK and the European Union.
Date:
The Government of Timor-Leste, in partnership with Asia Development Bank and UN Women, is conducting a Country Gender Assessment as a measuring tool for progress on equality between women and men. Factors such as women’s participation in the workforce, health, security, education, violence and justice have been examined to ascertain challenges and ways forward.
Date:
An initiation of self-help groups, collectives of women and men who work together to produce agricultural products, raise livestock, fish, and even create bricks for infrastructural development has changed not only the financial situation, but the gender division of labour of many communities in poverty-stricken Memo village of Timor-Leste.