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Myanmar’s population is facing a double crisis from the COVID-19 and the military takeover of February 2021, which is steadily wearing out their social and economic resilience.
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“Women in management positions are twice as likely as men in the same position to spend more time on DEI work that falls outside their formal job responsibilities,” says UN Women APAC’s Sarah Knibbs. Read on for Sarah’s thoughts on creating sustainable DEI impact, eliminating tokenism and accelerating equity. In this exclusive interview, Sarah spoke to People Matters about the key to sustainable DEI impact, the essentials to shaping transformative learning experiences and the role of men in enabling gender equity.
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These stories showcase the vision and (expected) impacts that some of the outstanding women entrepreneurs participating in WEA-initiated programmes aim to bring to creating a more inclusive workplace, marketplace, and community.
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Yulia Angelina Kurniawan, owner of WAYO Strawberry Jogjakarta, knows only too well the myriad sexist barriers – not only financial but also cultural – that women in Indonesia must overcome to succeed as entrepreneurs.
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Including women at the heart of crisis recovery will boost the economy and remove barriers to the creativity, perseverance and success of female entrepreneurs. At #SheBouncesBack @UNWomen has invited female small and medium-sized business owners to tell us about fighting the pandemic from the economic frontlines. Please join us and share your story!
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New self-help groups are aiming to start their own income-generating activities, and hopefully, diverse businesses that could provide some financial relief to survivors of domestic violence, widows, single mothers and other community members.
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With locally produced goods set up throughout the community centre, self-help group members in Timor-Leste were in high spirits, and enjoyed showing local leaders the proof of their labor.
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Honaria’s central market in the Solomon Islands was dirty, crowded, and well known for petty crime and harassment – particularly for its mainly-women vendors. For many, making it “women friendly” was a lost cause.