News
Stories
74 results found
1 - 10 of 74 Results

Women refugees on the front lines of COVID-19 response

Wednesday, June 24, 2020

We’re bringing forward the voices of women refugees who have been on the front lines of the pandemic, and who know the specific needs of their community better than anyone else. From sharing information on how to prevent the virus spread in Bangladesh to sewing protective face masks in Kenya, women refugees have stepped up to protect their communities and they cannot afford to be invisible in recovery plans.

From where I stand: Gauri Bista

Thursday, June 11, 2020

Caption Text bhisjadhaisdh The current crisis has created divisions in the villages. The lack of awareness about the pandemic has had huge consequences - migrants returning from India have been stigmatized and not allowed to return to their homes by the villagers. Such negative perceptions have even impacted their families and the social harmony in our community. Many of the migrant workers are returning home with no money. I am very worried to know that a majority of them are the...

Far from the spotlight, women workers are among the hardest hit by COVID-19 in Bangladesh

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

In 2019, over 700,000 Bangladeshi workers migrated overseas, through the Bureau of Manpower, Employment and Training (BMET) and around 100,000 of them were women. As countries around the world implement lockdown measures to curb the spread of COVID-19, many Bangladeshi migrants are back home with no income.

Women mobilize to prevent COVID-19 in crowded Rohingya refugee camps

Friday, April 17, 2020

To prevent an added humanitarian crisis in the already-vulnerable Rohingya refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, 24 Rohingya volunteers are working with UN Women to mobilize their communities and raise awareness on COVID-19.

High-level visit showcases Thai town working to end human trafficking

Wednesday, January 8, 2020

At first glance, Chiang Khong is like any other town in northern Thailand. Lined with hotels and restaurants, the river offers passersby a glimpse of Lao PDR on the other side. A bridge connecting the two countries means a steady flow of trade and travelers. But 20 years ago, Nunnaree Luangmoi confronted a major problem in the town: pervasive human trafficking and violence against women and girls.

Journeys out of the Ordinary | Bunga

Tuesday, November 26, 2019

I first decided to go abroad to work because I was separated from my husband and wanted to support my mother, my siblings and my young son. I found a job announcement on Facebook for work overseas as a waitress in Malaysia, and I contacted the person who placed the announcement. The job looked legitimate. There were administrative requirements and procedures, and I had to provide certificates and even a sponsor letter from the head of my village. I was told that I could go in two months.

Journeys out of the Ordinary | Yati

Tuesday, November 26, 2019

Before I migrated, my husband gambled, and we were in debt because of it. People kept saying that I could earn a lot by working abroad, and they encouraged me to go. I thought maybe it could solve all our problems. My daughter was four at the time. I worked as a domestic worker in Malaysia, imagining that I would earn a good sum of money and build a house back home. I thought, “I'll have a good employer who will treat me well”.

Journeys out of the Ordinary | Jejen

Tuesday, November 26, 2019

Like many other women migrant workers, family was my motivation to migrate. My husband had no regular income and was not paid well enough to support our two children, my sisters and our sick father. I migrated to Qatar to work as a domestic worker. When I first arrived in Qatar, I felt like I was walking into darkness. I also thought that that was normal, however, and it was okay to feel that way.

Journeys out of the Ordinary | Namwaan

Tuesday, November 26, 2019

I left Myanmar to go to Thailand 16 years ago because I wanted to have a better job and better wages. I could do many tasks, but there was no job in my village in Kayin State that provided enough income for me to support my family. At the time, information about migration was not as easy to find as it is today, especially in my small village.

Journeys out of the Ordinary | Ida

Tuesday, November 26, 2019

Like most people, earning money was my motivation to go work overseas. My first job was in Malaysia and it was not a good experience, but I lasted three years with the same employer. The second time I left was for different reasons. My husband had been unfaithful, and when I confronted him, he beat me. We divorced and he took my children from me. I thought my life couldn’t get any worse, but then my husband’s best friend raped me. I didn’t report it because I knew I would be the one who was judged.

1 - 10 of 74 Results