UN Women – United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women

UN Women – United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women

Asia and the Pacific

UN Women Nepal

Nepal has set itself the goal to graduate from least developed country status by 2022. Cited as one of the ‘fastest movers’ by the Human Development Report, the country has made significant progress towards achieving its development goals. The focus on broad-based economic growth and poverty alleviation has produced encouraging results, with the percentage of the population living below the poverty line falling from 42 in 1996 to 25.4 in 2011. Despite the difficult post-conflict transitional context, the country is expected to achieve six out of its eight Millennium Development Goals by 2015, and is likely to achieve targets for poverty and hunger, universal primary education, child mortality, maternal health and gender equality and women’s empowerment.

Women’s representation in the Constituent Assembly dramatically increased to 29 per cent in the November 2013 elections from 2.9 per cent in 1991 (in the then parliament). Additionally, Nepal has demonstrated active leadership in development issues globally, playing a formative role in the development and adoption of the Istanbul Programme of Action in 2011... Read more

   

News and Updates

Tamang has loved farming since childhood. And recent training provided by UN Women has made it more profitable as well. This photo was taken in Roshi village in December 2018. Photo: UN Women/Merit Maharjan

UN Women helps boost harvests for women in the hills of Nepal

Wednesday, July 31, 2019

Indra Maya Tamang says that for as long as she can remember, her family has farmed the land here in the hills of Nepal. “We have carried on with the practical knowledge that has been passed on to us from generations ago,” she says. But Tamang now also knows this: “Times are changing, the air we breathe is changing, and if we don’t learn new techniques now, we’ll be stuck in the past. One cannot afford to be constant — change is inevitable. That is why we too must keep moving forward.”

UN Women Nepal Deputy Representative Gitanjali Singh giving her remarks at the panel discussion. Photo: UN Women

Remarks: Launch of GRB GESI Manual

Friday, July 5, 2019

“We will never reach any of our objectives without the equal participation of half the world’s population, and without drawing fully on their expertise, capacities and experience”. Ending gender inequality is therefore both an outcome as well as a necessary condition for securing sustainable development. It is a necessary condition in the sense that women, especially those from the most excluded groups must be empowered to bring their differential experiences and interests to inform the development agenda.

Rukshana Kapali. Photo: UN Women/Laxmi Ngakhusi

From where I stand: “I identified challenges in both activisms, in terms of acknowledging intersectionality”

Thursday, June 20, 2019

“I was born in a traditional Newar household in Patan, Kathmandu Valley, and my childhood was highly influenced by my family’s cultural background. I lived in a big family with my grandparents and they did not speak Nepali. So, I grew up speaking Nepal Bhasa, my mother tongue. However, at school I would get shut out of my native language as I was only exposed to Nepali and English, the only two languages used in most educational institutions in Nepal.

Mr. Ghimire giving his remarks at the National Consultation on Beijing+25 Workplan held in Kathmandu last month   Photo: UN Women/Sadi Pokharel

Take Five: “Government alone cannot ensure effective implementation of laws and policies”

Thursday, May 30, 2019

Nepal’s transition from a unitary to a federal system has paved the way for the formulation of legal and policy reform, as well as restructuring and the establishment of mechanisms and organizations. We are still in the process of transferring funds and deploying civil servants to the sub-national levels. We believe that the new system of governance will be more effective for ensuring inclusion. The government will now benefit by having elected representatives and government officials at the sub-national levels where they can work in close proximity with the community.

Durga Sob. Photo: UN Women/Emad Karim

From where I stand: “Local and global political and economic systems create and maintain social inequality”

Friday, April 26, 2019

Over a journey of 25 years, we have seen many peaks and plains… The status of women in Nepal used to be very low. Child marriage was rampant; women were limited to household chores, deprived of education, health and employment opportunities, among others. There was very limited representation and participation of women in politics. Since then, substantial changes have taken place. The Constitution of Nepal (2015) guaranteed various rights to women.

Bhagwati Bhattarai-Baral holds the winning trophy. Photo: CAB Nepal

From where I stand: “We won the First International Women’s Blind Cricket Series”

Thursday, April 25, 2019

“I have been playing cricket since 2007, after receiving a one-week training at my school. I was in eighth grade then and the training was open to everyone in my class. We started playing amongst friends, sometimes even skipping classes to play cricket. Back then, our families weren’t supportive. No one believed that we would make it very far. Our society did not have confidence in blind players like us. We faced many challenges to continue our passion for cricket.

Photo: UN Women/Sadi Pokharel

Memorandum of Understanding signed by UN Women Nepal and Ministry of Women, Children and Senior Citizens

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

UN Women and the Ministry of Women, Children and Senior Citizens (MoWCSC) of the Government of Nepal signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) today to take forward their partnership in advancing gender equality and women’s empowerment in Nepal. The five-year agreement was signed by Wenny Kusuma, Representative of UN Women Nepal and Rudra Devi Sharma, Joint Secretary of MoWCSC, in the presence of Honorable Minister Tham Maya Thapa and Acting Secretary Bir Bahadur.

Padma Chaudhary prepares to start her day after taking her e-rickshaw out from a rented shed in Dhangadhi bazaar, where she parks it at night before returning home to Phulwari. Photo: UN Women/Merit Maharjan

Taking the wheels of her destiny on the roads of western Nepal

Monday, March 25, 2019

Padma Chaudhary, a 38-year-old mother of two, leaves early in the morning from her home in the village of Phulwari to her e-rickshaw stall almost 20 km away, in Dhangadhi bazaar. Decked in a smart, long red coat that matches her bright red chariot on wheels, she marvels at how much her life has changed in the months since she acquired the vehicle, which has allowed her to work independently.